tear off

(redirected from tearing off)

tear off

1. To pull or rip something off from a larger whole. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "tear" and "off." He tore off a lump of bread and used it to wipe the gravy off the plate. It felt like it was going to tear my arm off! Would you mind tearing off a piece of paper from your notebook for me to use in class?
2. To remove something with great haste. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "tear" and "off." He tore off his jeans when he realized a spider had crawled up the pant leg. I tore the cushions off the sofa to try to find my keys.
3. To leave or depart very quickly. The kids all tore off as soon as they heard the police car approaching. The motorcycle tore off down the street, ignoring stop signs and traffic lights on the way.
See also: off, tear

tear something off (of) someone or something

 and tear something off
to peel or rip something off someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Max tore the necklace off his victim and ran away with it. He tore off the necklace.
See also: off, tear

tear off (from someone or something)

to leave someone or something in a great hurry. I hate to tear off from you guys, but I'm late for dinner. It's time for me to go. I have to tear off.
See also: off, tear

tear off

1. Produce hurriedly and casually, as in He tore off a poem a day for an entire month.
2. Leave in a hurry, as in She tore off to the store because it was about to close. [c. 1900]
See also: off, tear

tear off

v.
1. To remove something by ripping or tearing: She reached for the gift and tore off the wrapping paper. He grasped the sales tag and tore it off.
2. To remove something quickly: I unbuttoned my jacket and tore it off. The feverish patient tore off the covers.
3. To leave or drive off rapidly: The painting crew tore off in their van.
4. To produce something hurriedly and casually: The new reporter tears off article after article.
See also: off, tear

tear off

in. to break away; to run away. Don’t tear off without having some of my pie.
See also: off, tear
References in periodicals archive ?
The video shows officers of the Banni police station breaking into and entering the house, beating and fighting the women present there, and then tearing off their clothes.
Winds reached up to 70mph, tearing off roofs from more than 200 houses and felling 14,000 trees.
Depicting Beowulf's mortal battle with the monster, the story tells how Beowulf bested Grendel by tearing off its arm, as its hide was enchanted and could not be pierced with mortal weapons.
I stared, agape, as he carried his prize up to the roof and starting poking the end of it into the area he had been tearing off. He was repairing the roof.
Millegan prepared for the role of an Internet-surfing masturbator in the movie On_Line by chatting up men in a "bear" chat room--not to mention tearing off his shirt and shoving his hand down his pants for the audition.
On the morning of the second day, a rebellion broke out, with prisoners tearing off their ID numbers and stocking caps, cursing the guards, and barricading their cell doors with their beds.
However, they sometimes pass out or go into frenzies of tearing off their clothes and clawing at their exposed skin, until they receive medical attention by staff on duty.
A DOUBLE-decker bus hit a bridge today tearing off its roof.
Tearing off the old shingles can add anywhere from a few hours to a day to a roofing job.
The plane skidded up the deck for about 300 feet and then off the bow, tearing off the remaining flap, damaging the tip tanks and the underside of the fuselage.
Often the company tearing off the shingles does not segregate the shingles from other construction waste, and the supply of shingles becomes "guts, feathers and all." This is an entirely unacceptable situation for the HMA producer.
The raiders prove adept at fungal nesting, tearing off bits of the sticky mass to create a cavity for their larvae and queen.
Three teenagers were found guilty yesterday of gang-raping a schoolgirl after tearing off her uniform in a shopping centre car park.
Charles Levin (as Gronam Ox, the sage of sages) was the best of a fine cast, sporting the look of a man perpetually delighted with the quip that has just popped into his head, tearing off his lines like big hunks of challah.