taters


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms.

taters

slang Cold. The term comes from rhyming slang in which "taters" (potatoes) is short for "taters in the mould," which rhymes with "cold." Primarily heard in UK. I'd wear a warmer coat if I were you—it's rather taters today. The food was taters when the waiter brought it out, so I sent it back to the kitchen.
See also: tater
References in periodicals archive ?
They're ground, mixed with oil, salt, and flavorings, and shaped into nutritional hand grenades known as Tater Tots.
Taters spun such rare grooves as "Do the Screw" by The Crystals, which goes for about $6000 copy.
Over 50 years Taters robbed the homes of the rich, art galleries and museums.
Taters stole the Duke of Wellington's swords from the Victoria and Albert Museum by tying two ladders together and breaking a window 40ft up.
Taters' last crime was at the age of 81 when he was hurt in a fall.
For about four years now I've trying to produce a good garden but nothing but quarter-size taters will grow.
Unlike most convenience foods from the postwar era, Tater Tots have been given a pass to reenter the culture.
Today, "Tater Tots" has become a proprietary eponym, the downside being that any generic knockoff that looks like a Tater Tot is called a Tater Tot.
Despite the inroads made by imposters, chances are Tater Tots will be just fine.
Caption: THE FLAVOR Tater Tots are basically just hash browns rolled into a ball, but onions and seasonings mixed into the batch give them their distinctive taste.