taste for

*taste for something

a desire for a particular food, drink, or experience. (Typically: get ~; have ~; give some-one ~; acquire ~.) The Smiths have a taste for adventure and take exotic vacations. When she was pregnant, Mary often had a taste for pickles.
See also: taste
References in classic literature ?
What a pity it is, Elinor," said Marianne, "that Edward should have no taste for drawing.
I shall not lose you so soon, and Edward will have greater opportunity of improving that natural taste for your favourite pursuit which must be so indispensably necessary to your future felicity.
The point is," I concluded my sermon, "that it is the accessibility of alcohol that has given me my taste for alcohol.
I read back in my life and saw how the accessibility of alcohol had given me the taste for it.
Thus perceiving a taste for a certain modern style of poetry in my companion, I bethought me of a poem which I had written on the roadside a few days before, and which, I confess, I was eager to confide to some sympathetic ear.
All meat tasted alike to him, for his taste for meat was one of the vanished pleasures in the limbo of memory.
He considered his disposition as of the sort which must suffer heavily, uniting very strong feelings with quiet, serious, and retiring manners, and a decided taste for reading, and sedentary pursuits.
A CHANGE in your taste for sugar, caffeine, alcohol and carbs can take away the appetite.
We know that the human tongue can detect five tastes -- sweet, salt, sour, bitter and umami (a taste for identifying protein rich foods).
In the eyes of reformers, those who over-indulged their taste for sweets or who did so in inappropriate circumstances not only risked their health; they flouted important social conventions as well.
Those of you with a taste for building supplies still have a nice selection to choose from.
Wishing to capitalize on the fact that 80% of Americans are not willing to sacrifice taste for more healthful, less flavorful foods (Source: InsightExpress), Culinova sought out a manufacturing partner that understands the importance of taste.
While genetics may guide your preferences, exposure to various kinds of foods also helps develop a taste for new delicacies.
In contrast, repeated electric shocks to their feet did not diminish rats' taste for sweetened water.
Toward end of cooking rice, taste for consistency; it should be firm but not crunchy.