tank up (on something)

(redirected from tanks someone up on something)

tank up (on something)

1. To fill the fuel tank of a vehicle (with a particular type of fuel). We'll need to tank up before we get on the highway tomorrow. I'm going to tank up on gas at the next rest stop.
2. To eat or drink (something) until one is full. We're going to be having dinner soon, so don't tank up on chips and candy. We stopped halfway to tank up on trail mix and water.
3. To drink alcohol to the point of intoxication. Don't tank up during lunch—we don't want any mistakes during the meeting this afternoon. He just sat silently at the bar, tanking up on whiskey and soda.
4. To ply someone with alcohol to the point of intoxication. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "tank" and "up." It was my 21st birthday, so my friends tanked me up on all manner of liquor. Someone spiked the punch to try to tank up the entire auditorium of students.
5. Of a substance, to cause someone to become intoxicated due to having been ingested. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "tank" and "up." Wow, that cocktail you made me really tanked me up!
See also: tank, up

tanked up

slang Drunk. The type of alcohol that one has been drinking can be included by adding "on" to the phrase and then naming it. It wasn't too smart to get tanked up the night before your exam, now was it? Do you remember last night at all? You were really tanked up on whiskey by the time I got there!
See also: tanked, up

tank up

 (on something) and tank up with something
1. Lit. to fill one's fuel tank with something. I need to tank up on premium gas to stop this engine knock. It's time to stop and tank up. We need to tank up with gas.
2. Sl. to drink some kind of alcoholic beverage. toby spent the evening tanking up on bourbon. Jerry tanked up with gin and went to sleep.
See also: tank, up

tank up

1. Fill a gas tank with fuel, as in As soon as we tank up the car we can leave. [First half of 1900s]
2. Drink to the point of intoxication. F. Scott Fitzgerald used this expression in The Great Gatsby (1926): "I think he'd tanked up a good deal at luncheon." This expression often is put in the passive, meaning "be or become intoxicated," as in My roommate really got tanked up last night. [Slang; c. 1900]
See also: tank, up

tank up

v.
1. To fill the tank of a motor vehicle with gasoline: Gas prices are so high, I can barely afford to tank up. Don't tank up with low-quality gasoline.
2. To eat, drink, or accumulate a supply of food or drink: Midway through the hike, we stopped by a stream to tank up on water. The travelers pulled into a roadside diner and tanked up.
3. Slang To intoxicate someone: Someone poured a bottle of vodka in the punch and tanked up the unsuspecting partygoers. The kids got tanked up on soda pop and ran around in the yard. Many of the revelers were too tanked up to drive home.
4. Slang To drink to the point of intoxication: The losing team is tanking up at the bar.
5. Slang To be consumed to the point of intoxicating someone: That last glass of whiskey really tanked me up.
See also: tank, up

tank up

verb
See tank
See also: tank, up

tanked up

verb
See tanked
See also: tanked, up