take the rap (for someone or something)

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take the rap (for someone or something)

To face punishment, blame, censure, or arrest for someone else's crime or misdeed, perhaps intentionally. We've made it look like he withdrew the money, so when the police start investigating, he'll be the one to take the rap. I'm always taking the rap for your mistakes—I'm sick of covering for you! Janet doesn't have any penalty points on her license, so she agreed to take the rap for Jeff.
See also: rap, someone, take

take the rap (for something)

Inf. to take the blame for (doing) something. I won't take the rap for the crime. I wasn't even in town. Who'll take the rap for it? Who did it?
See also: rap, take

take the rap

(for someone) Inf. to take the blame [for doing something] for someone else. I don't want to take the rap for you. John robbed the bank, but Tom took the rap for him.
See also: rap, take

take the rap

Be punished or blamed for something, as in I don't want to take the rap for Mary, who forgot to mail the check in time, or Steve is such a nice guy that he's always taking the rap for his colleagues. This slangy idiom originally used rap in the sense of "a criminal charge," a usage still current. By the mid-1900s it was also used more broadly.
See also: rap, take

take the rap

INFORMAL
If someone takes the rap, they are blamed for something bad that has happened, usually something that is not their fault. When the client is murdered, his wife takes the rap, but did she really do it? Note: `Rap' is slang for a criminal charge.
See also: rap, take

take the rap

be punished or blamed, especially for something that is not your fault or for which others are equally responsible.
The late 18th-century use of rap to mean ‘criticism’ or ‘rebuke’ was extended in early 20th-century American English to include ‘a criminal charge’ and ‘a prison sentence’. Compare with take the fall (at fall)
See also: rap, take

take the ˈrap (for somebody/something)

(informal) be blamed or punished, especially for something you did not do: She was prepared to take the rap for the broken window, even though it was her brother who had kicked the ball.
See also: rap, take

take the rap

verb
See also: rap, take

take the rap (for something)

tv. to take the blame for something. (see also rap.) I didn’t want to take the rap for the job, but, after all, I was guilty.
See also: rap, something, take

take the rap

Slang
To accept punishment or take the blame for an offense or error.
See also: rap, take
References in periodicals archive ?
Judge Timothy Spencer QC told him at Nottingham crown court: "This was a serious crime and you're taking the rap for others.
Yet Muslims seem to be the only group in Britain taking the rap for what is, and should always be, a crime in the civil law as well as the religious canon.
Reece Noi is brilliant as young Sean O'Connor who witnessed the shooting and ends up taking the rap for the killing.
Because he allegedly tried to trick police by taking the rap for Hash, Willis was cited for conspiracy to commit a felony, Carpenter said.
Girlfriend Heather Bellshaw, played by Jenni Keenan Green, kicks him out this week after taking the rap for his drugs stash.
He's doing everything he can to inspire the team even if at times he's the one who is taking the rap for it.
Saintly Michael is taking the rap for his girlfriend Sara killing bad guy Kim, so he's unhappily reunited with fellow captives T-Bag, Bellick and Mahone.
Judge Cartlidge said: "There are real serious consequences for taking the rap for someone else.
Shadrach demands a hot date as a reward for taking the rap for Zak, but instead gets Steph.
Enter Jennifer, a smart high-flier in the world of finance who has ended up on the wrong side of the law after taking the rap for her boss.
Claiming they're taking the rap for the sins of others, Charest and Weinberg said that all that money they spent was legitimately theirs, owed to them by Cinar.
I'M NOT sure who is taking the rap for the Sky Blues Bannergate at the moment, but I wouldn't fancy being in their shoes right now.