take the plunge

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take the plunge

1. To commit oneself to a course of action that is momentous or challenging. I'd been putting it off for years, but I finally took the plunge and enrolled in a college course. After spending 10 years as a junior partner, Karen is taking the plunge and starting her own law firm.
2. To commit to marriage. We'd been living together for three years and we already had a son together, so we decided it was time to take the plunge!
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

to marry someone. I'm not ready to take the plunge yet. Sam and Mary took the plunge.
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

Venture something, commit oneself, as in You've been living together for a year, so when are you going to take the plunge and get married? It is also put as make the plunge, plunge alluding to diving in a body of water. [Mid-1800s]
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

COMMON If you take the plunge, you decide to do something that you have been thinking of doing for some time, even though it is difficult, risky, or unpleasant. Helen decided to take the plunge and turned professional in 1991. Finally, Mona took the plunge. `I have something to tell you,' she said.
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

commit yourself to a course of action about which you are nervous. informal
See also: plunge, take

take the ˈplunge

(informal) decide to do something new, difficult or risky, especially after thinking about it for some time: After working for twenty years he’s decided to take the plunge and go back to college. OPPOSITE: get/have cold feet
A plunge is an act of jumping or diving into water.
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

tv. to marry someone. I’m not ready to take the plunge yet.
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

Informal
To begin an unfamiliar venture, especially after hesitating: After a three-year engagement, they're finally taking the plunge.
See also: plunge, take
References in periodicals archive ?
A husband and wife from a funeral home will be taking the plunge for charity.
Taking the plunge has brought swimming success for three members of the Blyth Lifeguard and Swimming Club.
Former Coundon Court School pupil Cheryl Oliver, aged 17, of Summers Road, Keresley, is taking the plunge in Oxfordshire for the Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign.
Catsuits They may look sexy on the Versace catwalk but if you're thinking about taking the plunge, be careful.
On Saturday, March 25, landlord Richard Morisot at the Malt Shovel in Church Road, Gaydon, will be taking the plunge from a 200ft crane with seven friends in aid of Myton Hospice.
But asked if he fancied taking the plunge with the performing seal the veteran actor said pool the other one.
It looked a long way down at only 35ft but I am now looking at taking the plunge from a 165ft tower
Coventry Sports Centre is taking the plunge and running a canoeing course for beginners.