take care of (someone or something)

(redirected from taking care of someone)

take care of (someone or something)

1. To look after, assume responsibility for, or care for someone or something. My mother started working weekends, so I have to stay home and take care of my siblings. I've asked Dave to take care of the Jefferson accounts while I'm gone. Will you take care of the parking while I go in and grab our tickets?
2. euphemism To murder someone or dispose of something. The mob boss told his lackey to take care of the witness so he couldn't testify. He needed to take care of the secret documents so that he wouldn't be caught with them in his possession.
See also: care, of, take

take care of someone or something

to oversee and protect someone or something; to care for someone or something. Please take care of my child while I am away. I will take care of everything for you.
See also: care, of, take

take care of someone

 
1. to tip someone. I took care of the doorman as we left. Did you remember to take care of the waiter?
2. Euph. to kill or dispose of someone. Max said he was going to take care of Lefty once and for all. The crime king ordered Max to take care of a certain private detective.
See also: care, of, take

take care of something

to deal with something; to handle or manage a problem or detail. Would you please take care of this little problem? This is an easy thing to take care of. I will fix it immediately.
See also: care, of, take

take care of

1. Attend to, assume responsibility for, as in Go ahead to the movies, I'll take care of parking the car, or They've hired someone to take care of the children for a week. [Late 1500s]
2. Beat up or kill someone, as in If he didn't pay up they threatened to take care of him and his family. [Slang; c. 1930]
See also: care, of, take

take care of

1 deal with (something). 2 put (a person) out of action by killing them, abducting them, etc.; dispose of.
See also: care, of, take

take ˈcare of yourself/somebody/something


1 make sure that you are/somebody is safe, well, healthy, etc.; look after yourself/somebody: I don’t need your help! I can take care of myself quite well, thank you!Don’t worry about the children while you’re away. They’ll be taken good care of.
‘Take care’ is often used alone when saying ‘goodbye’ to somebody Bye then! Take care!

2 be responsible for somebody/something; deal with somebody/something: Can you take care of the shopping if I do the cooking?There’s no need for you to pay the bill. It’s all taken care of (= it is already done).
See also: care, of, somebody, something, take

take care of someone

tv. to kill someone. (Underworld.) The boss told Spike to take care of Bart.
See also: care, of, someone, take

take care of

To assume responsibility for the maintenance, support, or treatment of.
See also: care, of, take
References in periodicals archive ?
Another example is taking care of someone else's child whose parents have fled the UAE.
In 2011, almost 44 million adult family caregivers were taking care of someone 50 years of age or older.
However, if one has a weakened immune system, such as smokers, or has been taking care of someone with TB for a long period, one faces the risk of getting infected increases.
"For customers who have been diagnosed with, or are taking care of someone who is living with diabetes, we hope these interactive events will help them to lead healthier lives, and assist them with their nutritional questions, needs and concerns while managing this condition."
I also understand more about family dynamics, which is so much a part of taking care of someone with dementia," she says.
Taking care of someone else's child is a world away from becoming a mother.
If we were to guess, she was probably off taking care of someone else.
For caregivers taking care of someone with Alzheimer's disease, Wheeling Township has a support group focused on providing ideas, comfort and friendship.
I work on a cardiac floor and love to strengthen my heart before taking care of someone else's.
While talking with the hosts of "The Talk" (via (http://www.etonline.com/carrie-ann-inaba-tears-talking-about-adoption-hopes-i-want-so-badly-have-child-89234) Entertainment Tonight ) Inaba said that she wants to adopt a baby who is at least two years old because she's scared of taking care of someone with a "wobbly head."
In this context, taking care of someone eventually implies in deciding for someone.
Others have gone through the difficulties of taking care of someone else, and the message here is that with patience and love, anyone can get through it.
Taking care of someone who is ill or unhappy will be rewarding.
Taking care of oneself is seen as an individual responsibility, whereas taking care of someone else is regarded as an economic transaction.
Women who feared "having to be taken care of" in old age generally outnumbered those who feared "taking care of someone else" by three-to-one.