take an interest in (someone or something)

(redirected from taking an interest)

take an interest in (someone or something)

To be or become concerned with, curious about, or interested in someone or something. John's really taken an interest photography lately. I'm not sure why the boss has taken such an interest in the intern—she seems to see some great potential in her that I don't. The president has reiterated that the government will not be taking an interest in any foreign country's business in the future unless it is directly related to our own.
See also: interest, take

take an interest in someone or something

to become concerned or interested in someone or something. Do you take an interest in your children? You should take an interest in everything your child does.
See also: interest, take

take an interest

1. Be concerned or curious, as in She really takes an interest in foreign affairs, or I wish he'd take an interest in classical music.
2. Share in a right to or ownership of property or a business, as in He promised to take an interest in the company as soon as he could afford to.
See also: interest, take
References in periodicals archive ?
When business owner Callum Wall reviewed CCTV footage, he saw three hooded men snooping around his property, taking an interest in a high-performance Mitsubishi Evo parked on the forecourt.
IT appears obvious from letters on this page that more people are taking an interest in their environment and demanding an improvement, especially now as we are experiencing yet another hike in our council tax.
"Jason's now shacked up with a younger model, in the form of Swedish beauty therapist Inca (Vera Filatova)," he explains, "but he still can't stop taking an interest in his ex's life."
Judging by the past few episodes, the first step in transforming a clothes shop's fortunes is convincing the owner it might be worthwhile taking an interest in fashion trends.
Being a good mum and dad - and by that I mean going to parents' evenings, taking an interest in your kids, making sure they're well mannered and adjusted - isn't something you can choose to opt in or out of.
CUT HIM SLACK It is possible, however, that your guy is suddenly taking an interest in his hygiene because he's actually starting to (gasp!) mature.
However, as in Europe, North America and other parts of the world, the government appears to be taking an interest in getting more involved.
Clearly not Kate, but if she was a single mum on a sink estate taking up with a notorious druggie the social services would and should be taking an interest. Money can't buy you love they say, but it does appear to purchase immunity.
And it is in this area that once again the airlines might finish up arguing with the European law makers who are also taking an interest. All carriers bring in third party operators due to technical and operational problems, on occasion at very short notice.
But Johnson said: "I must admit it's nice to be talked about in such a positive way, and I feel honoured that there are Premiership sides out there that are taking an interest in my progress.
But she does yearn to know more about her biological father, and when a stranger comes to town, taking pictures, taking an interest in her and Vivian, she is convinced the man is her long-lost father.
Canada's ratification of the Kyoto Protocol, rising energy prices and the general unpopularity toward creating more landfills are driving factors in government taking an interest in their project.
The Globe's recent articles, reflecting panic, show what happens when evangelicals and Catholics begin to flex some muscle by taking an interest in national politics.
While Christian Arabs, including Palestinians, are examining questions of faith, many Muslims appear to be taking an interest because of an upsurge in hatred against Jews now sweeping the Middle East.