take a walk

(redirected from taking a walk)
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

take a walk

1. Literally, to go on a walk. I'd love to take a long walk while we're up in the mountains. Janet is taking a walk in the woods with the kids.
2. By extension, to get out of here; to go away; to get lost. Usually used as an imperative. Listen, I don't want to buy any, so why don't you just take a walk and leave me alone! Take a walk, Jerry! I'm sick of your foolishness.
See also: take, walk
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take a walk

Leave abruptly, walk out. For example, If she's rude again I'm just going to take a walk, or The director would not put up with tantrums and ordered the young actress to take a walk . [Colloquial; late 1800s] Also see take a hike.
See also: take, walk
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take a walk

or

take a hike

INFORMAL
If someone tells you to take a walk or to take a hike, they are telling you very forcefully or angrily to go away or to stop interfering. Some of my female colleagues on the paper asked the editor not to publish my article. I'm pleased to report, he told them to take a walk. Anyone who complains about it can take a hike.
See also: take, walk
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

take a ˈwalk

(informal, especially American English) used to tell somebody to go away when you are angry with them: She told him to take a walk.
See also: take, walk
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take a walk

verb
See also: take, walk
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
See also: