take a bite out of (something)

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take a bite out of (something)

1. Literally, to remove a chunk from something with one's teeth. Ew, I don't want this apple—you've already taken a bite out of it! I took a small bite out of the slice of pizza, mindful that I might burn the roof of my mouth. The lion took a bite out of Tom's leg!
2. To reduce something by eliminating, completing, or removing part of it. The police are encouraging citizens to take a bite out of crime by reporting suspicious activity. I'm hoping to take a bite out of this project by Friday night so I don't have so much to do over the weekend.
See also: bite, of, out, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take a bite out of something

AMERICAN
If something takes a bite out of a sum of money or other quantity, it takes away a part of it. There will be higher taxes, so they will be taking a bigger bite out of people's income than before. But some of us, myself included, think we ought to have additional cuts in order to take a bigger bite out of the deficit.
See also: bite, of, out, something, take
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

take a bite out of

reduce by a significant amount. informal
See also: bite, of, out, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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