take (great) pains (to do something)

(redirected from takes great pains to)

take (great) pains (to do something)

To expend a lot of time and energy doing something. Your parents took great pains to ensure that you would have enough money for college. My grandmother always took pains to look her best, so losing her hair during her cancer treatment was especially difficult for her.
See also: pain, take

take (great) pains (to do something)

Fig. to make a great effort to do something. Tom took pains to decorate the room exactly right. We took great pains to get there on time.
See also: pain, take
References in periodicals archive ?
The characters are generally well created and engaging, although the author takes great pains to make their crimes such that the audience feels sympathy for them.
Although cross your fingers that it doesn't because presenter Dr Ian Mortimer, who wrote the book on which this is based, takes great pains to point out the multitude of ways in which life in Elizabethan England truly sucked.
She added that the gallery takes great pains to warn the public when an exhibition may be seen as offensive.
Although Market: Latin America takes great pains to present objective analyses of the status of the world's various market economies, we are occasionally caught, as they say, flat footed.
Conscious of a cultural climate in which priests and congressmen are censured for this sort of thing, The History Boys takes great pains to say, "He ought to know better," but the film's heart isn't really in it.
The play takes great pains to show Morocco's culpability (or lack thereof) in his own downfall, and a soggy reunion several years later between Morocco and Anton rings false and cliched.
Nevertheless, Tebeau takes great pains to demonstrate that between the 1870s and the 1940s firefighting became a profession: he deploys statistical tables (showing that firefighting careers became "longer over time" and that "firefighters' separation from the fire service" increasingly became voluntary) to demonstrate that by the twentieth century firefighting was a distinct occupation with its own culture, routines, and procedures.
In search of "a set of plausible and economical explanations for known developments, which [he] "take[s] to be the closest one can come to demonstrating causality in history," Saxton takes great pains to avoid the familiar proclivity to circular argument in the previous explanatory strategies.
Messenger takes great pains to point out that the preparations for D-Day pretty much started as the last man was evacuated from Dunkirk in May 1940.
For the most part, O'Ferrall takes great pains to present a balanced picture, yet slips badly--seeming to lose the human generosity of his faith, the soundness of his judgements, and even the customary grace of his prose--when writing about the Jews.
The author takes great pains to define "primary source" and then divides primary sources into five basic categories, each supported by descriptive examples.
A major bone of contention is whether Cosimo's patronage was in some sense "princely," a view she takes great pains to refute.
He takes great pains to explain why Tommy Hilfiger, Nike, Gap, and other apparel giants use sweatshop labor and deal with brutal, authoritarian regimes: because profit motive demands it.
In Ma Vie he takes great pains to justify his collaboration with France's Nazi occupiers during World War II.
With all of its homoerotic initiations and social bonds, the military also takes great pains to stigmatize unsublimated, garden, variety homosexuality.