take (great) pains with (something)

(redirected from takes great pains)

take (great) pains with (something)

To expend a lot of time, effort, and care doing something. Your tutor took great pains with your instruction, but it's obvious that you've totally wasted his time and our money! It's clear that the owners have taken great pains with the interior design of the new restaurant. My grandmother always took pains with her appearance throughout her life, so losing her hair during her cancer treatment was especially difficult for her.
See also: pain, take

take (great) pains (to do something)

Fig. to make a great effort to do something. Tom took pains to decorate the room exactly right. We took great pains to get there on time.
See also: pain, take

take pains with someone or something

Fig. to deal with someone or something with great care. He really took pains with me to make sure I understood it all. Ken took pains with the model plane.
See also: pain, take

take (great) ˈpains with something/to do something

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go to great ˈpains to do something

make a great effort to do something well, carefully, properly, etc: It looks easy but in fact he went to great pains to achieve that particular effect in his paintings.She takes great pains with the flower arrangements.
See also: pain, something, take
References in classic literature ?
'I should have told Charley, if he had come to me,' she resumed, as though it were an after-thought, 'that Jenny and I find our teacher very able and very patient, and that she takes great pains with us.
And he takes,' said my mother, with the tears which were engendered in her affectionate nature, stealing down her face, 'he takes great pains with me; and I ought to be very thankful to him, and very submissive to him even in my thoughts; and when I am not, Peggotty, I worry and condemn myself, and feel doubtful of my own heart, and don't know what to do.'
The characters are generally well created and engaging, although the author takes great pains to make their crimes such that the audience feels sympathy for them.
The language of the memo takes great pains to make clear it is non-binding, no reliance shall be placed on it and it does not constitute an obligation binding on any party.
He takes great pains to get his city, with its winding roads and tenements, right.
Although cross your fingers that it doesn't because presenter Dr Ian Mortimer, who wrote the book on which this is based, takes great pains to point out the multitude of ways in which life in Elizabethan England truly sucked.
The author takes great pains to blur the customary historical markers of this unlikely ocean crossing, while interspersing hints that a massive ship of the same name (or were there two of them?) may have been sunk due to torpedo attacks during both world wars.
Screenwriter Katie Wech takes great pains not to offend anyone so gives us a sanitised vision of high school in which no one swears, has sex, falls pregnant, smokes or takes substances that could result in a stern talking to.
Screenwriter Katie Wech takes great pains not to offend anyone, so gives us a sanitised vision of high school in which no one swears, has sex, falls pregnant, smokes or takes illicit substances.
The screenwriter takes great pains not to offend anyone so here is a vision of high school in which no one swears, has sex, falls pregnant, smokes or takes substances that could result in a stern talking to from the principal.
Screenwriter Katie Wech takes great pains not to offend anyone so here is a vision of high school in which no one swears, has sex, falls pregnant, smokes or takes substances that could result in a stern talking to from the principal.
Breaking down Beagle's novel must have been a herculean chore, considering that one of the great strengths of the novel is Beagle's lush voice, and Gillis takes great pains not to transfer long passages of lilting language onto the comics page, where such verbiage would become quickly tiresome.
She added that the gallery takes great pains to warn the public when an exhibition may be seen as offensive.
Although Market: Latin America takes great pains to present objective analyses of the status of the world's various market economies, we are occasionally caught, as they say, flat footed.
Conscious of a cultural climate in which priests and congressmen are censured for this sort of thing, The History Boys takes great pains to say, "He ought to know better," but the film's heart isn't really in it.