take a leaf out of (one's) book

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take a leaf out of (one's) book

To do something in the way someone else would do it; to behave or act like someone else. I think I'm going to take a leaf out of your book and start going for a run first thing in the morning.
See also: book, leaf, of, out, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take a leaf out of someone's book

 and take a page from someone's book
Fig. to behave or to do something in a way that someone else would. When you act like that, you're taking a leaf out of your sister's book, and I don't like it! You had better do it your way. Don't take a leaf out of my book. I don't do it well.
See also: book, leaf, of, out, take
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take a leaf out of someone's book

Imitate or follow someone's example, as in Harriet took a leaf out of her mother's book and began to keep track of how much money she was spending on food . This idiom alludes to tearing a page from a book. [c. 1800]
See also: book, leaf, of, out, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take a leaf out of someone's book

or

take a leaf from someone's book

COMMON If you take a leaf out of someone's book or take a leaf from their book, you copy them, usually because they were successful when they acted in that way. Note: The `leaf' in the last two expressions is a page of a book. Hollywood celebs should take a leaf out of Michael Douglas's book and make sure their websites are interesting and attractive. You're working too hard. Take a leaf from my book and relax!
See also: book, leaf, of, out, take
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

take a leaf out of someone's book

closely imitate or emulate someone in a particular way.
1999 London Student Maybe the other colleges should take a leaf out of Imperial's book and try pub games instead of sports.
See also: book, leaf, of, out, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take a leaf out of somebody’s ˈbook

follow somebody’s example because you admire them and their way of doing something: If you’re having difficulty with the children, take a leaf out of Sandra’s book. She knows how to control them.
Leaf is an old word for a page.
See also: book, leaf, of, out, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take a leaf out of someone's book, to

To imitate someone; to follow someone’s example. Literally, this expression alludes to either vandalism (tearing a page from a book) or plagiarism (copying someone else’s work). The figurative use of the term, which dates from about 1800, is much less nefarious. B. H. Malkin used it in his translation of Gil Blas (1809), “I took a leaf out of their book,” meaning simply, “I imitated them,” or “I followed their example.”
See also: leaf, of, out, take, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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