take a dim view (of someone or something)

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take a dim view (of someone or something)

To view (something) unfavorably; to disapprove (of something). I'm afraid the administration is taking a dim view of that legislation, so it will most likely get vetoed. Even though you might think it's a minor offense, the authorities still take a dim view. So far the boss has taken a dim view of the new intern.
See also: dim, someone, take, view

take a dim view of someone or something

to disapprove of someone or something. Of all the boys, the teacher likes Dave the least. She takes a dim view of him. I take a dim view of that law.
See also: dim, of, take, view

take a dim view of

Regard disapprovingly, as in I take a dim view of meeting every single week. This idiom, which uses dim in the sense of "unfavorable," was first recorded in 1947
See also: dim, of, take, view

take a dim view of something

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

take a poor view of something

BRITISH
COMMON If you take a dim view of something or take a poor view of it, you disapprove of it. The French take a dim view of anyone who only has a snack at lunchtime. Fellow critics took a poor view of a critic who reviewed Paramount films and accepted a fee from the studio.
See also: dim, of, something, take, view

take a dim (or poor) view of

regard someone or something with disapproval.
1996 C. J. Stone Fierce Dancing He says that…the Home Office…take a dim view of lifers talking to the press.
See also: dim, of, take, view

take a dim/poor ˈview of somebody/something

disagree with or dislike somebody/something: Farmers tend to take a dim view of the public walking over their land.The judge said he took a very poor view of their behaviour.
References in periodicals archive ?
In short, the IRS takes a dim view of partnerships solely as a means to minimize estate taxes.
The adjectives warn us that Kirkendale takes a dim view of earlier and current research in the field; almost every scholar who has worked in any depth on the subject is criticized, sometimes harshly, for lack of rigor, with contributors to the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (1980) hit particularly hard.
The program itself has considerable deficiencies, and the government takes a dim view of intentional welfare planning.