take the mickey (out of someone or something)

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take the mickey (out of someone or something)

To tease, mock, or ridicule (someone or something); to joke or kid around (about someone or something). A variant of "take the piss (out of someone)." Primarily heard in UK, Ireland. If you are so serious-minded that you can't take the mickey out of yourself every once in a while, you're going to have a hard time enjoying most of life. It really hurt Steph's feelings to know that the group had been taking the mickey out of her that whole time. Brian was a bit of a troublesome student and tended to take the mickey whenever class began.
See also: mickey, of, someone, take

take the mickey

mainly BRITISH, INFORMAL
COMMON If you take the mickey out of someone or something, you tease them or make jokes about them in a way that causes them to seem ridiculous. He started taking the mickey out of Joe because he's bald. I didn't know whether Neville was taking the Mickey out of me or not. Hey, are you taking the mickey? Note: You can also say that someone or something takes the mick out of someone or something. He's created a comedy that takes the mick out of absentee fathers and selfish mothers. Note: When someone behaves like this, you can call their behaviour mickey-taking. You can also call an instance of it a mickey-take. Until puberty I was really quite plump and had to put up with all the mickey-taking that went with it. It was actually a big mickey-take. Note: This expression may be based on rhyming slang. `To take the Mickey Bliss' means `to take the piss', a very rude expression which means to tease or make fun of someone. `Piss' is a slang word for urine.
See also: mickey, take

take the mickey

tease or ridicule someone, especially in an unkind or persistent way. informal, chiefly British
The origin of this phrase is unknown; take (or extract ) the Michael is a humorously formal variant.
See also: mickey, take

take the ˈmickey/ˈmick (out of somebody/something)

(British English, informal) make fun of somebody/something: Are you taking the mickey?People are always trying to take the mickey out of him because of his funny accent.
See also: mick, mickey, take

take the mickey out of

Chiefly British
To tease or mock (someone).
See also: mickey, of, out, take
References in periodicals archive ?
I've taken the mickey out of Paul a few times and disagreed with some of his comments, but I still respect his views.
GERARD Butler has taken the mickey out of his tough guy image by starring in US chat show host Jimmy Kimmel's annual Oscars spoof video.
Nicol in Newport loves that "everyone has a sense of humour and doesn't mind being taken the mickey out of.
Ben Harris, of New Brand Vision, which carried out the survey, said: "The food ads are so distinctive that there's lot of room for parody and people have taken the mickey.
We also got Brian Labone on the picture because he has always taken the mickey out of the three of us after winning the 1969/70 championship.
But unlike you, Syd, I've only been doing it for two years now and being 66 years-old, something tells me I'll never be as good as you, mainly because I've taken the mickey out of everyone from blondes, women drivers, politicians and experts and there's only so much you can say about them.
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