take away

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take away

1. verb To remove something from its current location. A noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "away." The tow truck came and took the abandoned car away. Here, let me take away these empty plates.
2. verb To rescind someone's access to something, usually as a punishment. A noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "away." My parents took my video games away for getting an F on my last test. Charlie, I swear to God I will take away the TV for a month if you don't get out here and do your chores this instant!
3. verb To arrest, capture, or otherwise detain someone. A noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "away." The government has been taking away anyone who challenges its ironfisted rule. Tom Thompson, you are under arrest for the murder of Samantha Samson. Take him away! The kidnappers took our daughter away and are holding her for a $2 million ransom.
4. verb To bring someone with one to someplace else, especially a location that is or seems to be more exciting or romantic. A noun or pronoun is used between "take" and "away." Take me away with you, Roberto! Show me the adventure I've always longed for!
5. noun The main point, lesson, or piece of information that one derives or retains from something. As a noun, the phrase is usually hyphenated or spelled as one word. I think the takeaway from this meeting is that we desperately need to improve efficiency.
6. noun Food from a restaurant that is picked up and taken home or somewhere else to be eaten. As a noun, the phrase is usually hyphenated or spelled as one word. Primarily heard in UK. I don't feel like cooking tonight, do you want to just get a takeaway?
7. noun In sports (typically American football and hockey), an instance of gaining possession of the ball or puck from the other team through a turnover, such as a fumble or interception. As a noun, it is usually hyphenated or spelled as one word. Cleveland is great at generating takeaways, especially against turnover-plagued teams.
See also: away, take

take someone or something away (from someone or something)

to remove someone or something to some distance away from someone or something else; to remove someone or something from the possession of someone or something else. Take her away from me! Take away that horrible food.
See also: away, take

take something away (from someone or something)

to detract from someone or something. The bright costume on the soprano takes a lot away from the tenor, who is just as important. The main subject of the picture is good, but the busy background takes away a lot.
See also: away, take

take away

v.
1. To remove something: Someone took my books away. Can you take away the trash?
2. To have something as the effect of an experience: I did not take away a good impression of the way things are run there. He took away a black eye from that fight.
3. To take someone along to a new place: I wish you would take me away with you.
4. To arrest someone or send them to prison or another place of incarceration: The police were threatening to take me away, so I left the country. The police took away the suspects to the courthouse.
5. To awe someone; cause someone to be emotionally captivated: The final scene of the movie took me away.
6. To win something easily, by a wide margin, or dramatically: It was a tense series of games, but our team took it away in the end. That film took away five Oscars.
7. Chiefly British To buy food at a restaurant and take it somewhere else to eat: Let's take away some Chinese food for lunch.
8. take away from To detract from something: Drab curtains took away from the otherwise lovely room.
See also: away, take