take up with


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be taken up with (someone or something)

1. To be occupied or engaged with something. Said especially of time or some amount thereof. Most of our time has been taken up with paperwork lately.
2. To begin being discussed or dealt with by someone or some group. Your query has been taken up with our appeals department.
3. To be or become interested or absorbed in something. I have been taken up with photography ever since I retired. I never read much as a kid, but then in high school I became completely taken up with Victorian literature.
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take (something) up with (one)

To initiate a discussion about something with someone, often regarding a problem or complaint. We'll take up the issue with the directors at the next board meeting. I'm sorry for the inconvenience, but you'll have to take it up with customer support.
See also: take, up

take up with (one)

To form a close relationship with or begin to associate or keep company with one. Often used in reference to an unsavory or untrustworthy person or group of people. He was a great student until he took up with a group of troublemakers and ended up getting expelled. Sarah has taken up with a much older man, and it makes me really uncomfortable.
See also: take, up

take up with (something)

To be or become interested or absorbed in something. I took up with photography after I retired. I never read much as a kid, but then in high school I was completely taken up with Victorian literature.
See also: take, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take up with someone

to become close with someone; to become friends with someone. I think that Albert may have taken up with the wrong people. I did not want Lefty to take up with Max, but he did, and look where it's gotten him.
See also: take, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take up with

Begin to associate with, consort with, as in She took up with a fast crowd. [Early 1600s]
See also: take, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take up with

Informal
To begin to associate with; consort with: took up with a fast crowd.
See also: take, up
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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