take the wind out of someone’s sails

take the wind out of (one's) sails

1. To diminish one's enthusiasm, excitement, or positive outlook (about something). She thought she'd won, but when I told her the letter was a scam, it really took the wind out of her sails. It took the wind out of his sails to learn that nearly half of his bonus would go to taxes.
2. To deprive one of an advantage; to make a situation unfavorable or detrimental for one. The crowd's deafening applause for the home team took the wind out of their opponents' sails. Learning that the boss was letting Jenny give a proposal for the project as well really took the wind out of my sails.
See also: of, out, sail, take, wind
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take the wind out of someone’s sails

tv. to put a barrier in someone’s path; to reduce the effectiveness of someone. When the cops showed Bart the evidence, it took the wind out of his sails.
See also: of, out, sail, take, wind
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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