take the fall (for someone or something)

take the fall (for someone or something)

To face punishment, blame, censure, or arrest for someone else's crime or misdeed, perhaps intentionally. We've made it look like he withdrew the money, so when the police start investigating, he'll be the one to take the fall. I'm always taking the fall for your mistakes—I'm sick of covering for you! Janet doesn't have any penalty points on her license, so she agreed to take the fall for Jeff.
See also: fall, someone, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take the fall

Sl. to get arrested for a particular crime. (Especially when others are going unpunished for the same crime. Walt and Tony pulled the job off together, but Tony took the fall. You did it, and I won't take the fall!
See also: fall, take
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take the fall

Incur blame or censure for another's misdeeds, as in She's taken the fall for you in terms of any political damage, or A senior official took the fall for the failed intelligence operation. This expression originated in the 1920s as underworld slang. It began to be extended to less criminal kinds of blame in the second half of the 1900s. Also see take a fall, def. 2.
See also: fall, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take the fall

receive blame or punishment, typically in the place of another person. North American informal
In late 19th-century criminals' slang fall could mean an ‘an arrest’, and this was later extended to mean ‘a term of imprisonment’. From this the US term fall guy meaning ‘a scapegoat’ developed in the early 20th century.
See also: fall, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take the fall

tv. to get arrested for a particular crime. (see also take a fall.) Joel Cairo and Wilbur pulled the job off together, but only Wilbur took the fall.
See also: fall, take
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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