take something out

take out

1. To remove or extract someone or something from something or some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "off." Will you take a couple of glasses out for our guests? I'm taking the kids out of school early so we can catch our flight to New York. They're taking my stitches out next week.
2. To bring, carry, or remove something to a specific location outside. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." Don't forget to take the trash out tonight, or it won't get picked up until next week. We need to take everything out of the house while it's being fumigated.
3. To withdraw money from a bank account. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." How much money should I take out during out trip? He took out an extra $20 to pay for the movie tickets.
4. To bring someone as a date, escort, or companion. In this usage, a name, noun, or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." She asked if she could take me out sometime for dinner or a movie. I'm taking my parents out to dinner to thank them for their help.
5. To borrow something in an official or formal manner. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." You can take out three books at a time from the library. Remember, you must sign your name to the register if you plan to take any equipment out for more than a day.
6. To punish or mistreat someone or something as a means of expressing or giving vent to a negative emotion. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out," often followed by "on (someone or something)." Sometimes phrased as "take it out on (someone or something)." Please don't take your anger out on the kids; they didn't do anything wrong. He's been taking his frustrations out on his coworkers lately.
7. To kill or murder someone. In this usage, a name, noun, or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." The fighter jets took out the enemy encampment. The mob boss ordered his goons to take the witness out.
8. To incapacitate or neutralize someone. In this usage, a name, noun, or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." The tight end took out the linebacker who was trying to tackle the quarterback. He took out his opponents in the election with an incredibly effective smear campaign.
9. To destroy, disable, or critically damage something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." The hurricane took out power lines across the state. I hope the blast didn't take the generator out.
10. To obtain compensation for something from a different source or in a different form. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." We'll be taking the cost of the computer your broke out of your paycheck. He couldn't pay me back the $250, so I took it out by having him paint the house for me.
11. To formally apply for and obtain or secure something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." She is taking out a lawsuit against her former employer for improper dismissal from her job. We're taking out a loan to help pay for the wedding.
12. To bring a domesticated animal, typically a dog, outside for exercise or to urinate or defecate. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." John, will you take the dog out? He's been scratching at the door for 10 minutes.
See also: out, take

take something out

tv. to bomb or destroy something. The enemy took out one of the tanks, but not the one carrying the medicine.
See also: out, something, take
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