take heart


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take heart

To have one's confidence, courage, or happiness bolstered (by something). We may have lost the election, but we take heart in the fact that so many young people are now engaged and excited about politics. I know you're upset about getting a rejection letter, but take heart—there's a good chance one of the other schools will accept you.
See also: heart, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take heart (from something)

to receive courage or comfort from some fact. I hope that you will take heart from what we told you today. Even though you did not win the race, take heart from the fact that you did your best. I told her to take heart and try again next time.
See also: heart, take
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take heart

Be confident, be brave, as in Take heart, we may still win this game. This idiom uses heart in the sense of "courage." [First half of 1500s]
See also: heart, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take heart

If you take heart from something, it makes you feel happier or more hopeful. Note: The heart is traditionally regarded as the centre of the emotions. The Americans have taken heart from the fact that fourteen other food-exporting countries have attacked the proposals too. Note: People also say take heart in order to encourage someone to be more hopeful. Take heart — you're not alone.
See also: heart, take
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

take heart

be encouraged.
See also: heart, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take ˈheart (from something)

feel more positive about something, especially when you thought that you had no chance of achieving something: The government can take heart from the results of the latest opinion polls.
See also: heart, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take heart

To be confident or courageous.
See also: heart, take
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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