take for


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take (one) for (something)

1. To presume or believe that one is a certain type of person. Huh. I didn't take you for the lying type. I'd advise you not to take her for a fool. She may play dumb, but she's very crafty.
2. To swindle, cheat, or defraud someone out of something, especially some amount of money. When all was said and done, that no-good lawyer took us for thousands of dollars.
3. To bring someone (to some location) in order to treat them to something. The boss said he would take us for pizza at the end of the week. Let's take the kids for ice cream tomorrow.
See also: for, take

take (some amount of money) for (something)

To accept some amount of money for the purchase of something. I'm not willing to take less than $10,000 for the car. Her motorcycle is really cool. I wonder how much she'd take for it.
See also: amount, for, of, take

take (someone or something) for (something)

1. To escort someone (to some place) in order to partake in some activity. I'm taking the kids for a bike ride this afternoon. He wants to take his family for a trip across the Midwest.
2. To escort someone (to some place) in order to treat them to something. The boss said he would take the entire office for pizza at the end of the week. After the movie, I'd like to take everyone for ice cream.
3. To bring someone or something (to some place) in order to go through some process. I have to take my car for its annual service this weekend. I'm taking Sarah for her doctor's appointment later.
4. To mistake someone or something for a different person or thing. Everyone takes me for my brother on the phone because of how alike we sound. I took the bird for an eagle, but it was actually a hawk. I at first took her silence as a rejection of my proposal, but she told me later that she was so taken aback that she couldn't respond right away.
5. To believe or assume, especially mistakenly, that someone or something is a certain way or in a certain condition. The regiment took the soldier for dead and left him behind. Never take for granted the security of your position in a company.
6. To regard someone or something as a particular kind of person or thing, especially mistakenly. You must take me for a fool if you think I would lend you such a huge amount of money. I wouldn't have taken him for the type of person who would begrudge his friend's success.
7. To cheat, swindle, or con someone or something for some amount of money. Between all the hidden fees, taxes, and surcharges, they took me for over $500! All in all, he took the company for nearly $2 million.
See also: for, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take someone for something

 
1. Lit. to escort someone to and through some activities, such as a walk, a swim, a ride, etc. Can I take you for a ride? He took me for a walk in the park, and then we came home.
2. Inf. to cheat someone by a certain amount of money. That crook took me for a hundred bucks. How much did he take you for?
See also: for, take
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take for

1. Regard as, as in Do you take me for a fool? [First half of 1400s]
2. Consider mistakenly, as in Don't take our silence for approval, or I think they took us for foreigners. [Second half of 1500s] Also see take for granted; what do you take me for.
See also: for, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take for

v.
To think someone or something is someone or something else: I'm sorry I called you the wrong name—I took you for one of your coworkers. Do you take me for a fool?
See also: for, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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