take cover


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take cover

To hide behind something to protect oneself from some airborne danger, especially gunfire or missiles. The police officer took cover behind a car as the shooter sprayed bullets in her direction. Citizens have been taking cover for nearly a week the enemy's bombardment has continued unabated.
See also: cover, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take cover

to seek shelter from gunfire or other projectiles. As soon as the firing started, we took cover behind a huge boulder.
See also: cover, take
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take cover

Seek protection, find a hiding place, as in It started to pour so we took cover under the trees, or He wanted to avoid the reporters so we said he could take cover in our summer cottage. This term uses cover in the sense of "shelter" or "concealment," a usage dating from the 1400s.
See also: cover, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take cover

To seek concealment or protection, as from enemy fire.
See also: cover, take
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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