take charge


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take charge

To assume responsibility, authority, or control over (someone or something). The manager had to take charge after the project failed to meet its initial deadline. Mary's going to take charge of the desk for the evening. I was unexpectedly asked to take charge of their children when they passed away.
See also: charge, take

take charge (of someone or something)

to take (over) control of someone or something. The president came in late and took charge of the meeting. When the new manager took charge, things really began to happen.
See also: charge, take

take charge

Assume control, command, or responsibility, as in I'll take charge of selling the tickets if you'll do the publicity, or They're not happy about the counselor who took charge of the children. [Late 1300s]
See also: charge, take

take ˈcharge (of something)

begin to have control or command: The Chief Inspector took charge of the investigations into the murder.
See also: charge, take

take charge

To assume control or command.
See also: charge, take
References in periodicals archive ?
Claim--With psychiatric patients there are contracts made to enable them to take charge of their health and made them responsible for the follow up.
IRISH referee Alain Rolland is being tipped to take charge of the World Cup final - but only if Ireland and France are knocked out of the competition.
To accomplish that, you should take charge and outline your own parameters and limitations as a candidate without being concerned that there will be any negative repercussions at all.
We think it's important to take charge of menopause, and you need all the information you can get to do that.
Indeed, you can once again take charge of your life.
The roadmap outlined in Taking Charge identifies three ways female senior executives take charge of their work and personal lives: