take care


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take care

1. Literally, to stay safe and be cautious or careful. Take care not to slip on the gravel as you're leaving. Be sure to take care and not get into any trouble while you're traveling.
2. Used by extension as a parting salutation. Thanks for visiting, take care!
See also: care, take

Take care (of yourself).

 
1. Good-bye and keep yourself healthy. John: I'll seeyou next month. Good-bye. Bob: Good-bye, John. Take care of yourself. Mary: Take care. Sue: Okay. See you later.
2. Take care of your health and get well. Mary: Don't worry. I'll get better soon. Sue: Well, take care of yourself. Bye. Jane: I'm sorry you're ill. Bob: Oh, it's nothing. Jane: Well, take care of yourself.
See also: care, take

take care

1. Be careful, use caution, as in Take care or you will slip on the ice. [Late 1500s]
2. Good-bye, as in I have to go now; take care. This apparent abbreviation of take care of yourself is used both orally and in writing, where it sometimes replaces the conventional Sincerely or Love in signing off correspondence. [Colloquial; 1960s]
See also: care, take

take care

said to someone on leaving them.
The usage arose out of the original, more literal sense, ‘be cautious’.
See also: care, take

take ˈcare (that .../to do something)

be careful: Take care that you don’t fall and hurt yourself.He took great care not to let his personal problems interfere with his work.
See also: care, take

Take care

tv. Good-bye, be careful. Take care. See you in Philly.
See also: care, take

take care

To be careful: Take care or you will slip on the ice.
See also: care, take
References in periodicals archive ?
He wasn't asking me or anyone else to take care of him.
In addition to having someone to take care of member's needs on-site, the Member Services Department of Private Retreats ensures all advance arrangements are taken care of, as well.
Caregivers need to find ways to take care of their own health so they can take care of someone else.
CATS takes care of the physical part, we take care of the emotional,'' Mittelman said Friday.
They were scared, but they were prepared to fight and take steps to take care of themselves.
Burke noted that pre-planning is on the rise, and he attributes it to the fact that people are now more willing to talk about pre-need and take care of all the details of the disposition of their own remains.
It's a place to worship, and we try to take care of it and keep it up, and I think we've done a pretty good job of keeping the old church in good repair.