take away from


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take away from (something)

To cheapen, demean, or detract from something. Don't let his petty comments take away from your amazing victory tonight. The water stain on our sofa completely takes away from the décor of the room.
See also: away, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take away from someone or something

to lessen the value or esteem of someone or something; to detract from someone or something. The fact that she is quiet does not take away from her one bit. The huge orange spot in the center of the painting takes away from the intense green of the rest of the work.
See also: away, take
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take away from

Detract, as in Her straggly hair takes away from her otherwise attractive appearance. [Second half of 1800s]
See also: away, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take away from

To detract from: Drab curtains took away from the otherwise lovely room.
See also: away, take
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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