take a running jump

take a running jump

To go away and leave one alone because what is being done or said is very irritating. Often used as an imperative. A: "The experiment might work better if you actually knew what you were supposed to be mixing together." B: "You know what, Jenny? Why don't you take a running jump?" Take a running jump, Dan. I don't need your sarcasm.
See also: jump, running, take

take a running jump (in the lake)

Sl. Go away!; Get away from me! You know what you can do? You can take a running jump. Beat it! You can just take a running jump in the lake, you creep!
See also: jump, running, take

take a running jump

mainly BRITISH, INFORMAL
If someone says that a person can take a running jump, they mean that they are annoyed with that person and do not care about their opinion. Yes, I've read what he wrote about the scheme and as far as I'm concerned, he can take a running jump. `I hope Mr Perry doesn't see this.' `Mr Perry,' Ed said, `can go take a running jump.'
See also: jump, running, take

take a running jump

used when angrily rejecting or disagreeing with someone.
1998 Oldie Get back to the studio and tell the focus groups to take a running jump!
See also: jump, running, take

take a running ˈjump

(old-fashioned, spoken) used to tell somebody in an angry or impolite way to go away: He asked me if I’d sell him the painting for $30, so I told him to take a running jump.
See also: jump, running, take

Take a running jump !

verb
See also: running, take