take a bath


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take a bath (on something)

Sl. to accumulate large losses on a business transaction or an investment. (Alludes to getting soaked, a slang expression meaning "being heavily charged for something.") Sally took a bath on that stock that she bought. Its price went down to nothing. I'm afraid that I will take a bath on any investment I make.
See also: bath, take

take a bath

Experience serious financial loss, as in The company took a bath investing in that new product. This idiom, which originated in gambling, transfers washing oneself in a bathtub to being "cleaned out" financially. [Slang; first half of 1900s]
See also: bath, take

take a bath

JOURNALISM
If a person or a company takes a bath, they lose a lot of money on an investment. It is America's third-biggest bank failure and its stockholders have taken a bath. Investors in the company took a 35 million dollar bath on the company, which entered bankruptcy proceedings 18 months ago.
See also: bath, take

take a bath

suffer a heavy financial loss. informal
1997 Bookseller When the yen drops in value, as it is doing right now, we take a bath. There is no way to change the prices fast enough.
See also: bath, take

take a ˈbath

(American English, informal, business) lose a lot of money, for example on a business agreement or an investment: Big investors sold their shares before the price crashed, but small investors took a bath. OPPOSITE: make, etc. a mint (of money)
See also: bath, take

take a bath

verb
See also: bath, take

take a bath

Informal
To experience serious financial loss: "Small investors who latched on to hot new issues took a bath in Wall Street" (Paul A. Samuelson).
See also: bath, take