take (someone) into (one's) confidence

take (someone) into (one's) confidence

To tell someone information with the understanding that they will not reveal what was said. Daniel, we've taken you into our confidence to discuss the direction of the company, and where we see you fitting into it. You're the only person I've taken into my confidence about this, so please don't discuss it with anyone else.
See also: confidence, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take someone into one's confidence

to trust someone with confidential information; to tell a secret to someone and trust the person to keep the secret. We are good friends, but I didn't feel I could take her into my confidence. I know something very important about Jean. Can I take you into my confidence?
See also: confidence, take
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take into one's confidence

Trust someone with a secret, as in She took me into her confidence and admitted that she was quitting next month. This idiom uses confidence in the sense of "trust," a usage dating from the late 1500s.
See also: confidence, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take somebody into your ˈconfidence

tell somebody your secret plans, problems, etc: She’s the only person I’ve taken into my confidence about it.
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
See also:
Idioms browser ?
Full browser ?