take (one) to task

take

1. verb, informal To swindle, cheat, or con (someone). Often used in passive constructions. I can't believe I let myself get taken like that. I should have known that guy was a scam artist! When all was said and done, that no-good lawyer took us for thousands of dollars.
2. noun, informal One's reaction to, impression of, or opinion about something. Tune in to my podcast this evening to hear my take on this whole situation. She's known for giving pretty hot takes about controversial topics.
3. noun, informal One's particular version or interpretation of something. The film represents the esteemed director's modern take on the classic fairytale.

take (one) to task

To scold, reprimand, lecture, or hold one accountable for some wrong or error they committed. Mom took me to task over my terrible report card. You don't have to take everyone to task who misuses the word "literally," you know.
See also: take, task, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take something

to endure something; to survive something. I don't think I can take any more scolding today. I've been in trouble since I got up this morning. Mary was very insulting to Tom, but he can take it.

take someone to task

to scold or reprimand someone. The teacher took John to task for his bad behavior. I lost a big contract, and the boss took me to task in front of everyone.
See also: take, task, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take to task

Upbraid, scold; blame or censure. For example, The teacher took Doris to task for turning in such a sloppy report. This term, dating from the mid-1700s, at first meant either assigning or challenging someone to a task. Its current sense dates from the late 1800s.
See also: take, task, to
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take someone to task

reprimand or criticize someone severely for a fault or mistake.
See also: someone, take, task, to
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take somebody to ˈtask (about/for/over something)

criticize somebody forcefully (for doing something wrong): I was taken to task for arriving late.She took the Government to task over its economic record. OPPOSITE: give somebody/yourself a pat on the back
See also: somebody, take, task, to
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take

1. n. a section of a film that is pronounced acceptable just after it is shot. After seven straight takes the crew demanded a break.
2. n. the amount of money taken in at some event; the money received for the tickets that have been purchased. The take was much larger than we expected.
3. tv. to cheat or deceive someone. When they think you’re going to count your change, they won’t try to take you.
4. tv. to defeat someone, as in a fight. Max thought he could take the guy, but he wasn’t sure.
5. n. money taken in a theft or illegal scheme. Let’s spilt up the take now, not later!
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

take

/call/bring to task
To reprimand or censure.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take to task, to

To reprimand; to blame or censure. This term was used from the mid-eighteenth century to mean either assigning or challenging someone to a task. In its present meaning it has been current only since the late nineteenth century. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle used it in Captain Polestar (1890): “My employer took me severely to task.” It sounds a bit stilted now and may be dying out.
See also: take, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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