take (one's) part

take (one's) part

To support or part with someone in an argument. You always take your wife's part, even if you don't agree with her! Thank you for taking my part at the meeting. I was starting to feel like I was on my own in there.
See also: part, take

take part

1. To share or participate (in something). They wouldn't let me take part in their game. I heard it was a great discussion. Did you take part?
2. To support or side with someone in an argument. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is typically used between "take" and "part." You always take your wife's part, even if you don't agree with her! Thank you for taking my part at the meeting. I was starting to feel like I was on my own in there.
See also: part, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take someone's part

Fig. to take a side in an argument; to support someone in an argument. My sister took my mother's part in the family argument. You are always taking the part of the underdog!
See also: part, take

take part (in something)

to participate in something. Bill refused to take part in the game. Everyone is asked to take part in the celebration.
See also: part, take
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take part

Play a role in, share in, participate, as in Will you be taking part in the wedding? or He did not take part in the discussion. [Late 1300s] Also see take one's part.
See also: part, take

take someone's part

Stand up for or support someone, as in Thanks for taking my part against the supervisor. This idiom uses part in the sense of "side in a dispute." It was first recorded in 1732, although a different version, take part with, dates from the early 1400s. Also see take sides; take part.
See also: part, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take someone's part

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If you take someone's part, you support them in an argument. It seemed to me that she should have taken my part and defended me from my father.
See also: part, take
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

take ˈpart (in something)

be one of a group of people doing something together; participate in something: He’s taking part in a golf competition this weekend.She never takes part in any community activities.
See also: part, take

take somebody’s ˈpart

(British English) defend or support what somebody has said or done, especially in an argument: Personally I take Emma’s part on this matter.He never takes my part in an argument.
See also: part, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take (someone's) part

To side with in a disagreement; support.
See also: part, take

take part

To join in; participate: She took part in the celebration.
See also: part, take
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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