swung


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swing for the fences

1. baseball Literally, to put all one's power into one's swing while batting so as to try to hit a home run. All they need is two more runs to win the game, so you can bet their star batter will come out swinging for the fences.
2. By extension, to put forward one's maximum amount of effort or energy (into or toward something); to act or perform with great intensity or effort. I wasn't sure about their state-appointed lawyer at first, but I was well impressed when he came out swinging for the fences on day one of the trial.
See also: fence, swing

swing the balance

To be the factor or provide the element that makes something happen or leads to success. We're hoping that the addition of new outdoor seating helps to swing the balance for the restaurant. A lot of the entries were very similar, so I'm hoping that the uniqueness of mine swings the balance in my favor.
See also: balance, swing

swing the lead

To feign illness to avoid work. Gerald's boss accused him of swinging the lead, but felt awful when he saw that Gerald was very sick.
See also: lead, swing

swing both ways

To be sexually attracted to both men and women. No, he doesn't just like guys, he swings both ways.
See also: both, swing, way

swing by

To visit someone or someplace casually and/or briefly. Just swing by when you get a chance—I'll be here all day. I need to swing by the grocery store on my way home.
See also: by, swing

swing at (someone or something)

To attempt to hit someone or something with one's fist or an instrument in a broad, sweeping stroke. Bill didn't hear me coming up behind him, and he swung at me when I touched his shoulder. He grabbed the tennis racket and ran around the yard swinging at the bee.
See also: swing

swing around

1. To spin or turn rapidly around in the opposite direction. I swung around when I though I heard my name. The police car swung around and turned on its siren to begin pursuing the van that ran the red light.
2. To cause someone or something to spin or turn rapidly around in the opposite direction. A noun or pronoun can be used between "swing" and "around." She had to swing the motorboat around and started heading back to shore. I had to swing the toddler around to keep him from walking down the steps.
3. To visit some place for a brief period of time or for a particular purpose. I need to swing around the office to pick up some paperwork. Why don't you swing around on Saturday for dinner?
See also: around, swing

swing into action

To begin some activity with great enthusiasm, intensity, and speed. The boss swung into action as soon as he learned there was a dispute between the two departments. I'm going to meet with my group on Saturday so we can swing into action on this project.
See also: action, swing

swing around (to something)

to move one's body or view around to another position. She swung around to the left, where she could see better. The bear suddenly swung around and charged.
See also: around, swing

swing into action

Energetically start doing something, as in Come on, let's swing into action before the others arrive. This idiom uses swing in the sense of "move vigorously."
See also: action, swing

swing both ways

be bisexual. informal
2001 Film Inside Out Florence has baggage. At one moment, there is a hint that she might swing both ways, or, maybe, only one since the guy thing is a fake.
See also: both, swing, way

swing the lead

malinger; shirk your duty. British informal
This phrase originated in the armed forces and the lead in question is probably a sounding lead, a lump of lead attached to a line and slowly lowered to determine the depth of a stretch of water. The connection between this process and shirking one's duty is not entirely clear.
See also: lead, swing

swing both ˈways

(informal) be bisexual (= sexually attracted to both men and women)
See also: both, swing, way

ˌswing into ˈaction

start to act efficiently and quickly: When the police heard about the bomb, they swung into action, searching the area with dogs and moving the public to safety.
See also: action, swing

ˌswing the ˈlead

(old-fashioned, British English, informal) (usually used in the progressive tenses) pretend to be ill/sick when you are not, especially to avoid work: I don’t think there’s anything wrong with her — she’s just swinging the lead.The lead (pronounced /led/ ) may refer to a weight at the bottom of a line that sailors used to measure how deep the water was. Swinging the lead was possibly considered an easy job, and so came to mean avoiding hard work.
See also: lead, swing

swing around

v.
1. To turn rapidly around something: The car swung around the corner and almost hit a pedestrian.
2. To turn rapidly to face the opposite direction: When I heard footsteps behind me, I swung around.
See also: around, swing

swing by

v.
To visit some place for a brief amount of time, especially as a deviation from a direct course: On my way home, I swung by the post office to buy some stamps. We swung by a friend's house on our way to the beach. Why don't you swing by for some coffee?
See also: by, swing

swing both ways

in. to be bisexual. Since he swings both ways, he may stand a better chance at finding a date.
See also: both, swing, way
References in periodicals archive ?
At the town's Arcadia roller skating rink, he swung swords for 36 hours and 12 minutes, while being fed and massaged by attendants.
On previous occasions, he had also swung clubs for 76 hours and swords for 25 hours.
He swung clubs, weighing 83 hours minutes swung 25 After leaving the army, George became an accounts clerk and lived with his wife Polly in North Jesmond Avenue in Newcastle.
2 : to turn on a hinge or pivot <The door swung open.
4 : to turn or move quickly in a particular direction <He swung the light in the direction of the noise.
Di Tullio timed semiprofessional baseball players as they swung various bats in air tunnels at MIT.
Launched in February of 2002, Swung Magazine is a dynamic new entry into the world of men's lifestyle and entertainment publications.
Miller, president of Swung stated: "The name and symbol change is a critical step for the company, signaling a new direction and a strong resolve to achieve success in publishing ventures.
One day after manager Jim Tracy said Bradley won't swing a bat for a week, Bradley swung one lightly and plans to swing at balls within the next couple of days.
He popularized a pantherine stance, dancing on the balls of his feet in deep plie, dropping his head and stretching out into a long, catlike line when he swung out.
If it's higher than parallel, you likely swung too far inside out, resulting in a high push and a loss of distance.