References in classic literature ?
The yellow men were armed with two swords, and a short javelin was slung across the back of each, while from their left arms hung cuplike shields no larger than a dinner plate, the concave sides of which turned outward toward an antagonist.
One of the swords which each of the warriors carried caught my immediate attention.
Alleyne had dropped his shattered sword and was standing, trembling in every limb, with his rage all changed in an instant to pity.
"So it was ordained, and then there was made a cry, that every man should essay that would, for to win the sword. .
d'Artagnan's sword kills; and, not only do I possess his sword, but he has himself taught me how to use it: and with that sword, when a befitting time arrives, I will avenge his name a name you have dishonored."
In the windows at the vacant end of the room stood six or eight, narrow-bladed swords with large protecting guards for the hand, and outside was a man at work sharpening others on a grindstone.
"It is very hot," said Athos, drawing his sword in its turn, "and yet I cannot take off my doublet; for I just now felt my wound begin to bleed again, and I should not like to annoy Monsieur with the sight of blood which he has not drawn from me himself."
In the rapid fighting that followed I had little chance to note aught else than the movements of my immediate adversaries, but now and again I caught a fleeting glimpse of a purring sword and a lightly springing figure of sinewy steel that filled my heart with a strange yearning and a mighty but unaccountable pride.
But there was Alan, standing as before; only now his sword was running blood to the hilt, and himself so swelled with triumph and fallen into so fine an attitude, that he looked to be invincible.
Then the youth swung his mighty sword in the air, and with one blow cut off the serpent's head.
"Ah, but the sword's the thing when you come to close fighting," said Mr.
"Look here, bachelor Corchuelo," returned the licentiate, "you have the most mistaken idea in the world about skill with the sword, if you think it useless."
All of virtue and chivalry and true manhood which his old guardian had neglected to inculcate in the boy's mind the good priest planted there, but he could not eradicate his deep-seated hatred for the English or his belief that the real test of manhood lay in a desire to fight to the death with a sword.
Then with sword and buckler girded at his side he made a goodly show.
D'Artagnan had, with his sword, cut in two the poor wretch who had laughed.