swoop

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at one fell swoop

All at once, with a single decisive or powerful action. When the economy crashed, thousands lost their jobs, their homes, and their pensions at one fell swoop.
See also: fell, one, swoop

in one fell swoop

All at once, with a single decisive or powerful action. When the economy crashed, thousands lost their jobs, their homes, and their pensions in one fell swoop.
See also: fell, one, swoop

one fell swoop

A single decisive or powerful action. When the economy crashed, thousands lost their jobs, their homes, and their pensions in one fell swoop. With one fell swoop, the military junta arrested the prime minister, executed its enemies in parliament, and assumed total control of the country.
See also: fell, one, swoop

swoop down

To rush quickly downward in an abrupt sweeping motion. He swooped down and picked up the toddler before she got too close to the steps. I love sitting on the pier, watching the birds swoop down to catch fish.
See also: down, swoop

at one fell swoop

 and in one fell swoop
Fig. in a single incident; as a single event. (This phrase preserves the old word fell, meaning "terrible" or "deadly.") The party guests ate up all the snacks at one fell swoop. When the stock market crashed, many large fortunes were wiped out in one fell swoop.
See also: fell, one, swoop

swoop down (up)on someone or something

 
1. Lit. to dive or plunge downward on someone or something. The eagle swooped down upon the lamb.
2. Fig. [for someone] to pounce on and consume something. The children swooped down on the ice cream and cake.
See also: down, on, swoop

one fell swoop, in

Also at one fell swoop. All at once, in a single action, as in This law has lifted all the controls on cable TV in one fell swoop. This term was used and probably invented by Shakespeare in Macbeth (4:3), where the playwright likens the murder of Macduff's wife and children to a hawk swooping down on defenseless prey. Although fell here means "cruel" or "ruthless," this meaning has been lost in the current idiom, where it now signifies "sudden."
See also: fell, one

in (or at) one fell swoop

all in one go.
This expression comes from Macduff's appalled reaction to the murder of his wife and children in Shakespeare's Macbeth: ‘Oh hell-kite!…All my pretty chickens, and their dam At one fell swoop?’
See also: fell, one, swoop

at/in one fell ˈswoop

with a single action or movement; all at the same time: Only a foolish politician would promise to lower the rate of inflation and reduce unemployment at one fell swoop.
See also: fell, one, swoop

swoop down

v.
To make a rush or an attack with or as if with a sudden sweeping movement: An owl swooped down on the rabbit.
See also: down, swoop

one fell swoop

A single and rapid act. “Fell” comes from an Old English word for frightful and “swoop” describes the way hawks and other birds of prey drop out of the sky to capture their victims. Accordingly, something that is done “in one fell swoop,” whether or not it is awful, happens with no hesitation. Shakespeare coined the phrase in Macbeth, where the character Macduff laments the murders of his wife and children with “What, all my pretty chick- ens and their dam / At one fell swoop?”
See also: fell, one, swoop
References in periodicals archive ?
color) Swooping polished curves on the Walt Disney Concert Hall on Grand Avenue are reflecting the sun into buildings, causing some discomfort.
The only protection Chelsea have is against English rivals swooping for the defender.
Outside my window sparrows fly Diving, swooping, passing by All together, then breaking away Perfect time in this display From pattern forming in the sky To land on tree and rooftop high Then rise as one, regroup once more Instinct gained from Nature's law A final swoop from this massed flight To blackthorn hedge then out of sight Chirping there in sparrow style Then silent for a little while Summer green and winter grey In fortress home or out to play Quiet, noisy, always there Giving pleasure every year Joy for us since their arrival A little help for their survival Not any antisocial trends Good company, our feathered friends.
The chicks kept running away but he obviously upset the adult birds and they started swooping and dive-bombing him.
Kate Davies of the RSPCA, which had 1,700 complaints about gulls in Wales last year, said: "Parent birds will make swooping attacks on people to protect their young.
Yet a handful can take on bigger and livelier prey, swooping down to pluck fish out of the water, silence a frog in midcroak, or grab a lizard off a wall.
He hit two free throws, then drove the length of the court for a swooping layup.
Any measures to minimise the impact of swooping vehicles at this busy junction will help improve lane discipline and therefore road safety.
Terrified Kathleen, 39, ended up jumping for cover in bus shelters to escape the swooping birds.
Unfolding his wide brown wings, the owl took off, first heading north toward some hills, then swooping back onto the highest branches of one of Water's towering eucalyptus trees.
Almost everyone has witnessed a flock of birds erupting from the ground in astounding unison, or a cloud of starlings swooping through the sky in a coordinated display of aeronautical acumen.
The viewer flies over MacArthur Park swooping past the famous lake and fountain, zipping down Seventh Street past popular Langer's Deli.
Employees have marveled at the majestic swooping of the birds.