swish

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swish

1. adjective Very classy, elegant, fashionable, or stylish. Primarily heard in UK. Wow, your dress is really swish! They're moving into a swish new flat next week.
2. adjective, offensive slang Effeminate; suggestive or characteristic of a stereotypical homosexual male. Primarily heard in US. Some of Tom's swish mannerisms have certainly made my dad raise his eyebrows. I try not be quite so swish when I'm around certain members of my extended family.
3. noun, offensive slang A derogatory term for a homosexual male. Primarily heard in US. He was fired for saying that he wouldn't rent the property to "a couple of swishes."

swish (something) off of (someone or something)

1. To remove a piece of clothing or fabric by pulling it quite quickly, producing a hissing or rustling sound as a result. He swished the sheets off of the furniture, sending clouds of dust up into the air. The magician's assistant swished his cape off of his shoulders as he rolled up his sleeves.
2. To brush, sweep, or flick something off of the surface of someone or something else. My wife swished the cat hair off of my shoulders before I left for my interview. Let me just swish these hair clippings off of the chair before you sit down, sir.
See also: of, off, swish

swish around

1. To slosh, splash, or swirl around (inside of something). A: "How can you tell the ball is waterlogged?" B: "I can hear water swishing around in it." Don't drink too much water, or you'll feel it swishing around while you're running.
2. To cause some liquid to slosh, splash, or swirl around (inside of something). In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "swish" and "around." Why do you swish your wine around in the glass like that? Swish the liquid around to help the salt dissolve into it.
See also: around, swish

swish off

1. To remove a piece of clothing or fabric by pulling it quite quickly, producing a hissing or rustling sound as a result. A noun or pronoun can be used between "swish" and "off." He swished the sheets off the furniture, sending clouds of dust up into the air. The magician's assistant swished off his cape as he rolled up his sleeves.
2. To brush, sweep, or flick something off of the surface of someone or something else. A noun or pronoun can be used between "whisk" and "away." My wife swished the cat hair off my shoulders before I left for my interview. Let me just swish off these hair clippings before you sit down in the chair, sir.
3. To take someone away (from some place) very abruptly or hurriedly; to whisk someone away. A noun or pronoun can be used between "swish" and "off." Tom swished Martin off to a side room to discuss his meeting with the board in private. I'd love it if Mary swished me off to some place exotic for our anniversary.
See also: off, swish

swish around

[for a fluid] to slosh or rush around. All that water I drank is swishing around in my stomach. I can hear the water swishing around in the pipes.
See also: around, swish

swish something off (of) someone or something

 and swish something off
to brush something off someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) The barber swished the loose hairs off of Paul's collar. The barber swished off the loose hairs.
See also: off, swish

swish

(swɪʃ)
1. mod. overly fancy; effeminate; displaying effeminacy. The lobby of the theater was a little swish, but not offensive.
2. n. elaborate decoration; effeminacy. What this place needs is more swish. Hang some baubles here and there.
3. n. a gay male. (Rude and derogatory.) This place is full of swishes. Let’s leave.
References in periodicals archive ?
Homophile attitudes towards swishes mirrored the two dominant heterosexual attitudes towards homosexuals.
Many passing gay men adopted a similar liberal attitude towards swishes, offering pity rather than scorn.
At the same time, physique publications reinforced an explicitly masculine postwar iconic representation of male homosexuality, furthering the impression that swishes were out of step with the more middle-class character of postwar gay identity.
I'd rather be an honest, loud-spoken swish than a sugarcoated phoney." For many swishes, swishing simply felt "natural" and authentic to them.
Several self-identified swishes wrote letters to ONE in a camp linguistic style.
June's letter is also notable because it came from a small town; swishes were usually associated with large cities.
Readers accused swishes of trying to "take over" the magazine when contents seemed too swishy.
Facing ostracism from other gay people as well as from the rest of society, some swishes internalized the prejudices directed against them.
Despite the calm assurances from liberal-minded passing gay men that swishes could be taught to pass, John's letter described how traumatic this process could be.
Swishes, conversely, directly challenged masculine supremacy in an atmosphere of cold war hysteria while lending credence to pre-Kinsey theories that associated male homosexuality with "gender inversion." Practicing masculinity in order to pass as heterosexual as well as swishing represented complex negotiations with the broader postwar gender order, and both carried unique anxieties and consequences.