swinging


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swing for the fences

1. baseball Literally, to put all one's power into one's swing while batting so as to try to hit a home run. All they need is two more runs to win the game, so you can bet their star batter will come out swinging for the fences.
2. By extension, to put forward one's maximum amount of effort or energy (into or toward something); to act or perform with great intensity or effort. I wasn't sure about their state-appointed lawyer at first, but I was well impressed when he came out swinging for the fences on day one of the trial.
See also: fence, swing

come out fighting

To compete or defend someone or something passionately or aggressively. After hearing so much opposition to his proposed construction project, the developer came out fighting at the town hall meeting. They may be underdogs in this series, but you can be sure that they'll come out fighting.
See also: come, fight, out

come out swinging

To compete or defend someone or something passionately or aggressively. After hearing so much opposition to his proposed construction project, the developer came out swinging at the town hall meeting. They may be underdogs in this series, but you can be sure that they'll come out swinging.
See also: come, out, swinging

swing the balance

To be the factor or provide the element that makes something happen or leads to success. We're hoping that the addition of new outdoor seating helps to swing the balance for the restaurant. A lot of the entries were very similar, so I'm hoping that the uniqueness of mine swings the balance in my favor.
See also: balance, swing

swing the lead

To feign illness to avoid work. Gerald's boss accused him of swinging the lead, but felt awful when he saw that Gerald was very sick.
See also: lead, swing

swing both ways

To be sexually attracted to both men and women. No, he doesn't just like guys, he swings both ways.
See also: both, swing, way

swing by

To visit someone or some place casually and/or briefly. Just swing by when you get a chance—I'll be here all day. I need to swing by the grocery store on my way home.
See also: by, swing

swing at (someone or something)

To attempt to hit someone or something with one's fist or an instrument in a broad, sweeping stroke. Bill didn't hear me coming up behind him, and he swung at me when I touched his shoulder. He grabbed the tennis racket and ran around the yard swinging at the bee.
See also: swing

be swinging the lead

To be feigning illness to avoid work. Primarily heard in UK. Gerald's boss thought that he was swinging the lead, so she felt awful when she saw that Gerald was actually in hospital.
See also: lead, swinging

swing around

1. To spin or turn rapidly around in the opposite direction. I swung around when I though I heard my name. The police car swung around and turned on its siren to begin pursuing the van that ran the red light.
2. To cause someone or something to spin or turn rapidly around in the opposite direction. A noun or pronoun can be used between "swing" and "around." She had to swing the motorboat around and started heading back to shore. I had to swing the toddler around to keep him from walking down the steps.
3. To visit some place for a brief period of time or for a particular purpose. I need to swing around the office to pick up some paperwork. Why don't you swing around on Saturday for dinner?
See also: around, swing

swing into action

To begin some activity with great enthusiasm, intensity, and speed. The boss swung into action as soon as he learned there was a dispute between the two departments. I'm going to meet with my group on Saturday so we can swing into action on this project.
See also: action, swing

swing for (someone or something)

1. To attempt to strike someone or something, as with a punch or a handheld weapon. The guy swung for me when I tried to calm him down. She grabbed the bat and started swinging for the piñata.
2. To be executed by hanging for some crime one has committed. Under the brutal dictatorship, you could swing for even whispering dissatisfaction with the government. A: "Yes, I confess, it was I who murdered her!" B: "You'll swing for this, Ericson."
See also: swing

swing for the bleachers

1. In baseball, to put all of one's power into one's swing while batting so as to hit a home run. A less common variant of "swing for the fences." All they need is two more runs to win the game, so you can bet their star batter will come out swinging for the fences. I picked up the bat, imagined myself in Wrigley Field, and got ready to swing for the bleachers.
2. By extension, to put forward one's maximum amount of effort or energy (into or toward something); to act or perform with great intensity or effort. I wasn't sure about their state-appointed lawyer at first, but I was impressed when he came out swinging for the bleachers on day one of the trial. After years of middling sales, it's clear that the company is finally swinging for the bleachers with its aggressive new marketing push.
See also: swing

swing from (something)

1. To move to and fro while suspended from something above. The cable came loose and began swinging from the top of the tower. The kite became tangled in a tree and swung from one of its branches.
2. To move to and fro while hanging onto something that is suspended from above. We took turns swinging from the rope. The meat swung from a hook in the walk-in cooler.
3. To hang onto something and move forward in a broad, sweeping arc or curve in order to propel oneself in a leap. He swung from the horizontal flagpole up onto the rooftop. The monkeys are able to cover great distances swinging from the vines above the jungle floor.
See also: swing

swing into (something)

To begin or enter into some state or action with great speed, enthusiasm, or intensity. The city has begun swinging into full-scale preparations for the 200th anniversary parade. We should be ready to swing into production next month.
See also: swing

swing into gear

To begin doing something at a higher speed, intensity, or level of enthusiasm. The city is swinging into gear in its preparations for the anniversary parade. I'm going to meet with my team on Saturday so we can swing into gear on this project.
See also: gear, swing

swing into full gear

To begin doing something at a higher speed, intensity, or level of enthusiasm. The city is swinging into full gear in its preparations for the anniversary parade. I'm going to meet with my team on Saturday so we can swing into full gear on this project.
See also: full, gear, swing

swing into high gear

To begin doing something at a higher speed, intensity, or level of enthusiasm. The city is swinging into high gear in its preparations for the anniversary parade. I'm going to meet with my team on Saturday so we can swing into high gear on this project.
See also: gear, high, swing

swing to (someone or something)

1. To propel (oneself) in the direction of something by hanging onto something suspended from above and moving in a broad, sweeping arc or curve. You've got to grab the rope and swing to the other side of the ravine. The burglar held onto the flagpole and swung to the ledge of the open window.
2. To turn or pivot in some direction on or as on a hinge. The refrigerator door swings to the right when you open it.
3. To cause someone to move to some point or in some direction with a swooping or sweeping motion. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "swing" and "to." He swung his dance partner to the side. Let's swing this thing to the other side of the room. The bouncer swung the rowdy man to the ground.
4. To shift or vacillate to some different opinion, belief, ideology, emotion, etc. Public opinion has continued to swing in favor of previously socially unacceptable behaviors and lifestyles. The whole world has swung to online banking, Dad. You really need to get with the times if you want to keep up.
5. To cause someone or some group shift or vacillate to some different opinion, belief, ideology, emotion, etc. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "swing" and "to." You're not going to swing anyone to your side with such inflammatory arguments. Age tends to swing people to more conservative mindsets.
6. To convince or persuade someone or some group to something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "swing" and "to." The incident swung the entire population to side of the rebel leaders. She managed to swing the board to fund her side project for the next five years.
See also: swing

swing with (someone or something)

1. To understand, agree with, or support someone or something. OK, I can swing with most of the rules you've laid out, but some of them are just silly. A: "I was thinking we could paint this room green." B: "Yeah, I can swing with that!"
2. To be able to compete or contend with someone or something. Don't worry, I think I'll be able to swing with some dusty old professor in a debate. They may be a small company, but they've proved they can swing with the biggest and best in the industry.
3. slang To engage in promiscuous sexual intercourse with someone outside of one's marriage or committed relationship. We've been swinging with couples from all over town for the past 10 years, and it has only ever made our own marriage stronger. He said that he and his wife wanted to swing with me, but I told them I wasn't into that sort of thing.
See also: swing

swing around (to something)

to move one's body or view around to another position. She swung around to the left, where she could see better. The bear suddenly swung around and charged.
See also: around, swing

swing into high gear

to begin operating at a fast pace; to increase the rate of activity. During the winter season we swing into high gear around here. The chef swings into high gear around six o'clock in preparation for the theater crowd.
See also: gear, high, swing

swing into action

Energetically start doing something, as in Come on, let's swing into action before the others arrive. This idiom uses swing in the sense of "move vigorously."
See also: action, swing

come out fighting

mainly BRITISH or

come out swinging

mainly AMERICAN
COMMON In a conflict or contest, if someone comes out fighting or comes out swinging, they show by their behaviour that they are prepared to do everything they can in order to win. Thompson came out fighting last night, accusing his old board colleagues of deliberately damaging his reputation. Deputy Prime Minister John Waters came out swinging against front-runner Martin Jackson in the weekend leadership debate. Note: If boxers come out fighting, they leave their corner as soon as the bell rings and attack their opponent immediately.
See also: come, fight, out

be swinging the lead

BRITISH
If someone is swinging the lead, they are pretending to be ill to avoid working. Note: Lead is a very heavy metal. It is a question of getting the right benefits to the right people, and we want to stop anyone swinging the lead. Note: In the past, when a ship was in shallow water, one of the sailors would drop a piece of lead on a string, called a plumbline, over the side of the ship to find out how deep the water was. Sometimes sailors would just swing the plumbline, because they were too lazy to do the work properly. `Plumb the depths' is also based on this practice.
See also: lead, swinging

swing both ways

be bisexual. informal
2001 Film Inside Out Florence has baggage. At one moment, there is a hint that she might swing both ways, or, maybe, only one since the guy thing is a fake.
See also: both, swing, way

swing the lead

malinger; shirk your duty. British informal
This phrase originated in the armed forces and the lead in question is probably a sounding lead, a lump of lead attached to a line and slowly lowered to determine the depth of a stretch of water. The connection between this process and shirking one's duty is not entirely clear.
See also: lead, swing

swing both ˈways

(informal) be bisexual (= sexually attracted to both men and women)
See also: both, swing, way

ˌswing into ˈaction

start to act efficiently and quickly: When the police heard about the bomb, they swung into action, searching the area with dogs and moving the public to safety.
See also: action, swing

ˌswing the ˈlead

(old-fashioned, British English, informal) (usually used in the progressive tenses) pretend to be ill/sick when you are not, especially to avoid work: I don’t think there’s anything wrong with her — she’s just swinging the lead.The lead (pronounced /led/ ) may refer to a weight at the bottom of a line that sailors used to measure how deep the water was. Swinging the lead was possibly considered an easy job, and so came to mean avoiding hard work.
See also: lead, swing

swing around

v.
1. To turn rapidly around something: The car swung around the corner and almost hit a pedestrian.
2. To turn rapidly to face the opposite direction: When I heard footsteps behind me, I swung around.
See also: around, swing

swing by

v.
To visit some place for a brief amount of time, especially as a deviation from a direct course: On my way home, I swung by the post office to buy some stamps. We swung by a friend's house on our way to the beach. Why don't you swing by for some coffee?
See also: by, swing

swing both ways

in. to be bisexual. Since he swings both ways, he may stand a better chance at finding a date.
See also: both, swing, way

swing into high gear

in. to begin operating at a fast pace; to increase the rate of activity. The chef swings into high gear around eight o’clock in preparation for the theater crowd.
See also: gear, high, swing

swinging

mod. great. The concert was swinging—nothing like it, ever.
References in periodicals archive ?
he also swords for hours He said: "George's achievements were quite remarkable in standing for hours, swinging heavy clubs and swords.
And thank you for letting me share my experience with swinging chickens.
These methods of swinging on a swing, although of considerable interest to some people, can lose their appeal with age and experience.
However, setting your right shoulder too high will force you to lift your club, swinging it back outside the target line.
Avoid swinging your club with every ounce of strength in your body.
Stegnian was out of breath from spinning, kicking and stepping her way across a makeshift dance floor in front of the Carousel, swinging to the sounds of Big Band horns and jazzy pianos.
At one point, Swing/ literally takes off, with two of the dancers, Beverly Durand and Bentley, flying across in harnesses, thrust into swinging aerobics by partners Aldrin Gonzalez and Fowler.
Understand the sequence of motion: Sequence of setting up, swinging and driving with the correct weight transfer is a major factor.
With PBS' ``Jazz,'' a monumental 10-part series airing on KCET through the remainder of January, documentarian nonpareil Ken Burns wrests the music from both the eggheads and the hacks and presents it in its classic, swinging form in all its glory.
Early rock, such as "Heartbreak Hotel," has a lot of rhythmic drama compared with neorock ("Pink Cadillac"), yet even that Presley classic lacks the polyphonic interplay of melody and rhythm that made a swinging song like "Just a Gigolo" so inspiring for dancers.
Because any repetitive swinging at low pitches may cause the hitter to develop a long swing.
The band continued its relentless tour schedule, gradually building what was to become a fiercely loyal fan base for its swinging Cab Calloway/Louis Jordan sound.