swing state


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swing state

In U.S. general elections, a state that votes in roughly equal proportion for candidates of both the Democratic and Republican Parties and whose influence on the election has the power to determine the outcome.. With the country so deeply divided between these two candidates, it will come down to just a handful of swing states to determine who will be the next president.
See also: state, swing
References in periodicals archive ?
senator, governor and attorney general, the electorate in many states tend to lean strongly toward one major party or the other these are often described as Republican "Red States" and Democratic "Blue States." More competitive states, or "swing states," are those in which statewide elections are much tighter from cycle to cycle, and party control is more elastic.
President Donald Trump's steel and aluminum import tariffs may play havoc with economic orthodoxy, but they fit an established American political tradition: They mostly benefit the swing states that carried the 2016 election for Trump.
North Carolina lived up to its swing state reputation as there were Fil-Ams who voted for Trump.
"Pick one from a swing state that's in play and you might get a marginal boost.
In the world Swing State represents--impoverished industrial towns in the rural Northeast--no form of protection exists for those pushed to the brink by poverty and violence.
Manley noted Republicans are facing tough races for Senate seats in swing states such as Ohio, Florida, New Hampshire, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania and could find themselves in even tighter spots because of the divisive fight over Scalia's replacement.
By 2032, Florida moves from a Democratic swing state to a solid blue state.
Fournier takes a singularly unflinching look at just this situation in Swing State, a brisk yet bleak novel that gets into the heads of three distinct characters facing the grim realities of an economic recession in rural New England.
Esbeck noted that the positive effects of the swing state initiative grew eHponentially when there was coordination between the state association and NTCR.
In a paper on federal grants for the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, John Hudak found that "swing states receive about 9% more grants and almost 7% more grant dollars than non-swing states when an election is proximate" (Hudak 2011)--a pattern certain to increase as swing state status becomes more predictable.
Florida is a pivotal swing state. In 2008 and 2012, Florida voters supported President Barack Obama by narrow margins.
The Global Swing State Project has a superficial approach towards the normative aspect of international order and deals with the issue in terms of human rights and democracy.
But I couldn't help wondering if we were electing the president of Colorado or Florida or some other swing state. Oddsmakers and pundits say we will elect the president of Ohio, "the swingingest state with most" electoral votes.
Obama's victory in the hotly contested swing state of Ohio - as projected by TV networks - was a major step in the fight for the 270 electoral votes needed to clinch the White House and ended Romney's hopes of pulling off a string of swing-state upsets.
The president won solid Democratic states and a number of swing states. His narrow victory in Ohio, a critical Mid-Western swing state, sealed the victory.