swing for

swing for (someone or something)

1. To attempt to strike someone or something, as with a punch or a handheld weapon. The guy swung for me when I tried to calm him down. She grabbed the bat and started swinging for the piñata.
2. To be executed by hanging for some crime one has committed. Under the brutal dictatorship, you could swing for even whispering dissatisfaction with the government. A: "Yes, I confess, it was I who murdered her!" B: "You'll swing for this, Ericson."
See also: swing

swing for something

Fig. [for someone] to die by hanging for committing a crime. The sheriff swore that Tex would swing for the killing. Max said he would not swing for something that Lefty had done.
See also: swing
References in periodicals archive ?
Strovolos municipality announced on Tuesday that one of its parks now includes a swing for children on wheelchairs.
After carrying out your last waggle, return your club to the ball before taking your club back smoothly to swing for real.
As far as having a swing for two or more adults, they tend to get the push me/pull me thing going on and are not able to really swing.
The work optimization yielded a hub path that most closely resembled the original swing for this subject, and a swing angular profile that was indistinguishable from the original profile.
The James Greenop Foundation, set up following the death of Everton FC fan James after he was knocked down on Speke Road, Garston last October, donated the final PS500 needed to buy a swing for his garden.
He may come really good while playing abroad, because there is swing for the fast bowlers.
Glamorgan paceman Simon Jones is happy that his reverse swing for England is putting the Aussies on the back foot
Push me!" A lady came over and pushed the swing for me, and I told her I wanted to stop.
Because Judge is not merely celebrating swing for its own sake; he's trying to make a larger point about the state of society.