sweep off one's feet, to

sweep (someone) off (someone's) feet

To cause someone to be admiring or infatuated.
See also: feet, off, sweep

sweep off one's feet, to

To overwhelm; to carry away with enthusiasm. This metaphor suggests knocking a person down, or at least sideways, in the process of making an impression. The term, also put as to carry someone off his feet, dates from the nineteenth century. Clarence Day used it in The Crow’s Nest (1921): “You can’t sweep other people off their feet if you can’t be swept off your own.”
See also: off, sweep