sweat equity


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sweat equity

Work that one puts into a property or other venture, so as to increase its value. It is perhaps most commonly used to describe improvements or repairs that one makes to one's home. We're putting some sweat equity into our house by redoing our kitchen. Did you see that glowing write-up in the newspaper? All the sweat equity he put into his company is finally paying off.
See also: sweat
References in periodicals archive ?
Fortunately, leaders across our profession are committing their time, resources and "sweat equity" to drive long-term diversity progress.
Roughly 36 British Sterling for the 4 Motorola phones ($56.09 US) and some sweat equity in programming.
Additionally, they contribute 500 hours of "sweat equity" on the construction of a Habitat home--theirs or someone else's.
Selection is based on applicants' housing needs, willingness to complete 350 hours of "sweat equity," residency and ability to pay the interest-free mortgage.
So you can see, the money you save from putting in your own sweat equity is definitely worth it.
At age 29 Fuller left a lucrative business career to serve the poor, practicing what he later called "the theology of the hammer." Since then Habitat volunteers and residents investing "sweat equity" have constructed at least 300,000 homes for more than a million people in some 100 countries.
Studley donated sweat equity as well as $20,500 to the charity, $10,500 of which was raised by Studley executives who challenged Rob Link, executive vice president and branch manager of Studley's Denver office, to shave off his iconic salt and pepper mustache.
Hoffman all serving aboard Bush, the Hoffman's family has put a significant contribution in "sweat equity" into the Navy's newest nuclear-powered carrier.
Digging a drainage ditch or plastering a wall isn't the obvious route to your dream home - but for thousands of people across the UK "sweat equity" has proved to be the ideal way to build the home, and the community, they want to live in.
"If we're not putting a little bit of sweat equity into finding (Michigan) wines, shame on us.
The home owners must invest 500 hours of "sweat equity" physically working on site instead of paying a pounds 10,000 deposit.
In addition to those small business owners who have expended a good deal of "sweat equity" - forgoing income and putting their homes on the line to build up their business - these changes will hit other investors, from venture capital to employees who take a stake in their company's future.
Mohanan writes that "the initiatives of the Indian government in formulating policies regarding sweat equity, stock options and tax breaks for venture capital along with overseas listings have all contributed to the enthusiasm among investors and entrepreneurs." His article discusses problems of the Indian VC industry and the outlook for it, concluding that India's "tremendous potential for growth in knowledge-based industries is not only confined to information technology but is equally relevant in several areas such a biotechnology, pharmaceuticals and drugs, agriculture, food processing, telecommunication, services, etc."