swamper

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swamper

1. Someone who lives or works in a swamp or swampy region. You'll want to hire one of the local swampers to help you navigate these parts. This little church has been the place of worship for Okefenokee swampers for nearly 150 years.
2. Someone who clears trees and underbrush to make a path for loggers in a forest. My job is to cut away branches and shrubs with my chainsaw, while swampers follow behind me clearing it all away.
3. Someone who works as an all-purpose assistant, especially for a truck driver or trucking company. I worked as a swamper for five years before they gave me the chance to actually get behind the wheel. Our swampers are expected to be able to unload an entire haul in less than an hour.

swamper

n. a helper or assistant, especially an assistant in food service or in trucking. (Very old.) This guy and his swamper showed up to deliver the stuff, but neither one of them would touch it.
References in periodicals archive ?
We had the extraordinary good fortune to meet David Hood, the Swampers' bass player.
All have beaten a path to Florence, Muscle Shoals and Sheffield to harness the creativity of the Swampers.
Even prior to the enactment of conscription, Kate Stone recorded in her diary her poor neighbors' angry contention that Joe Carson was "a rich man's son too good to fight the battles of the rich," and she later described a company of poor men "who naturally have an ill feeling against the 'rich swampers.'" Additionally, a Confederate official complained that Governor Moore's 1861 exemption of slaveholders from the state militia "defeat[ed] that harmony and cordial cooperation ...
She considers communities of rice planters, slaves and fugitives, antebellum writers, Seminoles, surveyors, lumber companies, Swampers, the government, and preservationists, conflicts between each group, and their individual views about the area.
But with the jumbo kind--formerly demonized as rogues, or boat swampers and living oil wells--we have a good deal less excuse.
Two swampers, who cut brush to make path to get tree out of the yard.
The swampers, as these pioneers were known, also left their names on such places as Mixon's Hammock, Minnie's Lake, Craven's Island and Chesser Prairie.
The swampers who lived within the Okefenokee until the early 20th century learned to find their way around by studying the thickness of tree bark.
In the beginning of the winter they enter the forests again, establish themselves in huts covered with the bark of the canoe-birch, or the arbor-vitro; and, though the cold is so intense that the mercury sometimes remains for several weeks from 40[degrees] to 50[degrees] [Fahr.] below the point of congelation, they persevere, with unabated courage, in their work." According to Springer, the company consists of choppers, swampers,--who make roads,--barker and loader, teamster, and cook.
Sinclair's talent at weaving issues, from harvesting to taxation, into his stores of woods history and policy make his subjects come alive, from the "swampers" who cut logging roads to the timber baron David Pingree Jr., whose land Sinclair eventually managed for Pingree's descendants.
Mine were "swampers": high tops like the lumberjacks wore, but made of rubber.
Years after watching the first Swampers video on VHS titled The Nor' Easter, my dreams of hunting the Atlantic Coast for sea ducks appeared to be coming true.
One reason was the four-man houseband - called the Swampers - who provided the bedrock of the worldfamous sound.
"These letter patterns," said Captain Brian Rhodes, owner of The Swampers, an the East Coast-based outfitting service, "are just guidelines; something simple to go by.