swack


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swack

1. noun A hard or sharp blow or strike; a thwack. She gave him a swack to the head when he leaned in for a kiss. Back in my day, teachers wouldn't hesitate giving unruly students a swack on the hands.
2. verb To strike someone or something forcefully; to thwack someone or something. I don't like the way he swacks his dog on the nose for peeing in the house, but it's not my place to tell him how to train the thing. Swacking the computer like that isn't going to make it work any better.

swacked

slang Drunk. You spent the whole night getting swacked on cheap vodka, so I'm not surprised you woke up with a splitting headache. We were all too swacked to drive, so I had to call my husband to come pick us up from the restaurant.

swacked

(swækt)
mod. alcohol intoxicated. He walked straight out of the office and went straight into the bar with the intention of getting swacked.
References in periodicals archive ?
Swack said the fact that the Balsams project is not looking to get traditional TIF bonds through government backing is not extraordinary, but may mean that the developer would have to pay more interest or other incentives than a traditional TIF, which is backed by a state or municipality.
There's no such thing as a green product, so all you can do is create a benchmark to work toward," Swack said.
"Leveraging Autodesk's worldwide customer reach and reputation among designers and manufacturers will allow us to quickly bring sustainable product design into the mainstream in an accessible and empowering way," said Terry Swack, CEO and co-founder of Sustainable Minds.
I've already met with a fair swack of them and they don't view me as some young kid.
Diplomatically put, but unless Prentice comes up with a swack of cash to expedite land claims settlements--the putative reason for the June 29 protest--hotter and less nicely coifed heads than Fontaine's might err on the side of harm.
University of Wisconsin musicologist Jeanne Swack will talk about Georg Telemann's music and anti-Judaic sentiments.
(2.) See Cheryl Swack, Safeguarding Artistic Creation and the Cultural Heritage: A Comparison of Droit Moral Between France and the United States, 22 COLUM.-VLA J.L.
"Falsch!" der Meister would shriek at the first missed note, "Start over!," his screams punctuated in summer by the swack of the flyswatter with which he defended his territory against Vienna's plague of flies.
(125.) See Cheryl Swack, Building a Bridge for Defense: The European Union's Common Foreign and Security Policy, 6 U.
David Swack, a budget official at the EPA, explains that the $800 million will allow the CWSRF to maintain a "capitalization"--the pool of money that can be loaned, with repayments channeled back into the pool--at $2 billion a year.
Swack, `On the origins of the Sonate auf Concertenart', Journal of the American Musicological Society, xlvi (1993), pp-379-90.
Kirsten Beisswenger discusses an alternative - possibly early - version of the first movement of the Italian Concerto; and Jeanne Swack provides a reading of the incomplete A major Flute Sonata BWV 1032 that differs from previous evaluations and that convinces by its thoroughness.
Each of the forums will feature an introduction to impact investing by Michael Swack, a professor at the University of New Hampshire's Carsey School for Public Policy who co-authored a report from the Global Impact Investing Network, titled "Scaling U.S.
"With the proliferation of program operators, complex reporting requirements, and increased demand for these services, we saw the potential to deliver real and measurable value to manufacturers by launching this consortium," affirms Sustainable Minds CEO and founder Terry Swack. "[It] can create uniformity that will significantly reduce market confusion."