surgery


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brain surgery

A task requiring extreme intelligence, skill, or competence, usually used in a negative or rhetorical manner to indicate the opposite. Just follow the directions as they're written—it isn't brain surgery.
See also: brain, surgery

meatball surgery

Battlefield surgery that is performed hastily so as to quickly stabilize a patient and prevent imminent death. Popularized (and possibly coined) by H. Richard Hornberger in his semi-autobiographical novel M*A*S*H, which focused on doctors serving in a fictional mobile army surgical hospital during the Korean War. Primarily heard in US. At the height of the conflict, our surgeons were primarily concerned with meatball surgery, getting wounded soldiers patched up long enough to receive more specialized treatment down the line.
See also: surgery

in surgery

to be involved in surgery. (Can refer to a doctor, nurse, or patients.) Dr. Smith is in surgery now. The patient is still in surgery.
See also: surgery
References in periodicals archive ?
Costs associated with the 3-year increase in hospitalization could amount to roughly half again the $25,000 price tag for the surgery, the researchers say.
Obesity treatments that may be considered under the new policy include diet plans, weight-loss medication, use of dietitians and gastric bypass surgery.
Endonasal sinus surgery with endoscopical control: From radical operation to rehabilitation of the mucosa.
Associate dean and professor of cardiac surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
In the past, hip replacement surgery was an option primarily for people over 60 years of age.
How does remote control surgery differ from conventional surgery?
The company's products operate at lower temperatures than traditional electrosurgical or laser surgery tools and enable surgeons to remove, shrink or sculpt soft tissue and to seal bleeding vessels.
they feel the risks of surgery and anesthesia are greater than the benefits
If the insurance company covers it, then from there on you're marked as someone who's had this surgery, and everything that follows, healthwise, will be under question [as to] whether it relates to sex-reassignment surgery.
The psychological, social and medical factors affecting length of recovery time and employment of individuals following coronary bypass surgery are discussed, as well as the importance for rehabilitation professionals understanding of the individual's functional capacities regarding employment following coronary bypass surgery.
Another factor was the difference between the scheduling of cases in day surgery and in the main operating room.