surface

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Related to surfaces: equipotential surfaces

below the surface

Into or among the deeper aspects of something, as opposed to those that are most easily identified. When you write your book reports, please look below the surface of the text and analyze the author's stylistic choices.
See also: below, surface

beneath the surface

Into or among the deeper aspects of something, as opposed to those that are most easily identified. When you write your book reports, please look beneath the surface of the text and analyze the author's stylistic choices.
See also: beneath, surface

look beneath the surface

To focus on the deeper aspects of something, as opposed to the traits that are most easily identified. When you write your book reports, please look beneath the surface of the text and analyze the author's stylistic choices.
See also: beneath, look, surface

on the surface

Superficially; considering only the obvious details or outward appearance (of someone or something). On the surface, he seems like a really successful businessman, with his life all put together. But if you pull back the curtain a bit, you realize that his life is a mess. Everything looked fine on the surface, but after we began we realized that the plan was fundamentally flawed.
See also: on, surface

raise (someone or something) to the surface

To lift someone or something or cause someone or something to float up to the surface of a body of liquid. We attached floatation devices to the swimmer's arms to raise her to the surface. A fleet of 15 two-person submarines attached harnesses to the ancient structure in an effort to raise it to the surface.
See also: raise, surface

scrape (someone or something) up off (something)

To peel or gather something or someone up from some surface, such as the floor or the road, especially when that person or thing is or seems to be stuck to it. I passed out after drinking at the party until 6 AM, and I had to be scraped up off the floor the next morning. I spent about an hour last night scraping dried pizza cheese up off the carpet.
See also: off, scrape, up

scratch the surface (of something)

To do, engage with, or understand something to only a minimal or superficial degree. I know you feel like you know everything about philosophy now, but this introductory course only scratches the surface. Jack never felt satisfied devoting his time and attention to one thing, so instead he's scratched the surface of a number of hobbies and interests.
See also: scratch, surface

skim the surface (of something)

To do, engage with, or understand something to only a minimal or superficial degree. I know you feel like you know everything about philosophy now, but this introductory course only skims the surface. Jack never felt satisfied devoting his time and attention to one thing, so instead he's skimmed the surface of a number of hobbies and interests.
See also: skim, surface

raise someone or something to the surface (of something)

to bring someone or something up to the surface of a body of water. The pull of the inflatable life vest raised Tom to the surface of the water. The divers were able to raise the sunken ship to the surface.
See also: raise, surface

scratch the surface

 
1. Lit. to scratch something just on the surface, not extending the mark below the finish into the wood, stone, marble, below. There is no serious damage done to the bench. You only scratched the surface.
2. Fig. to just begin to find out about something; to examine only the superficial aspects of something. The investigation of the governor's staff revealed some suspicious dealing. It is thought that the investigators have just scratched the surface. We don't know how bad the problem is. We've only scratched the surface.
See also: scratch, surface

on the surface

Superficially, to all outward appearances, as in On the surface he appeared brave and patriotic, but his troops knew better. [Early 1700s]
See also: on, surface

scratch the surface

Investigate or treat something superficially, as in This feed-the-hungry program only scratches the surface of the problem, or Her survey course barely scratches the surface of economic history. This metaphoric term transfers shallow markings made in a stone or other material to a shallow treatment of a subject or issue. [Early 1900s]
See also: scratch, surface

scratch the surface

COMMON If you only scratch the surface of something, you deal with or benefit from a very small part of something much bigger. The council have managed to provide housing for over ten thousand homeless people but they say they have only scratched the surface of the problem. At 13, her potential as a player is enormous and she has only scratched the surface of what she can do.
See also: scratch, surface

scratch the surface

1 deal with a matter only in the most superficial way. 2 initiate the briefest investigation to discover something concealed.
See also: scratch, surface

scratch the ˈsurface (of something)

deal with, understand, or find out about only a small part of a subject or problem: This report only scratches the surface of the problem. OPPOSITE: get to the bottom of something
See also: scratch, surface

below/beneath the ˈsurface

what you cannot see but can only guess at or feel: She seems very calm but beneath the surface I’m sure that she’s very upset.Beneath the surface of this beautiful city there is terrible poverty and suffering, which tourists never see.
See also: below, beneath, surface

on the ˈsurface

when you consider the obvious things, and not the deeper, hidden things: On the surface she can be very pleasant and helpful, but underneath she’s got problems.The plan seems all right on the surface.
See also: on, surface

scratch the surface

To investigate or treat something in superficial or preliminary fashion.
See also: scratch, surface

on the surface

To all intents and purposes; to all outward appearances: a soldier who, on the surface, appeared brave and patriotic.
See also: on, surface

scratch the surface, to

To perform a task or investigate something superficially. This term comes from agriculture, where merely scratching the surface of the earth does not adequately prepare the soil for planting. It was transferred to other activities by the early 1900s. “You haven’t seen anything. They didn’t scratch the surface here,” wrote Lillian Hellman (Days to Come, 1936).
See also: scratch
References in periodicals archive ?
If the part is not fully packed at the point farthest from the gate, where the pressure is lowest, the mold surface texture will not be reproduced exactly, resulting in a glossy surface.
As a matter of fact we discourage this greatly because of poor performance and even safety criteria that result from too soft and unstable playing surfaces."
If not dissolved in the metal or oxidized, solidification can proceed against the accumulation of carbon films, giving rise to the characteristic surface wrinkling associated with lustrous carbon defects, Examination of these casting surfaces indicates a strong tendency for defects to form along the edges of the first stream of molten metal that enters the mold cavity.
The covering, which they say can be applied to fabrics and hard surfaces, is an example of "how nanotechnology is working its way into the coating world," says Rubner.
Adhesive failure can be more difficult to determine, but can be linked to surface contamination, overheating of adhesive and primers, or poor phosphate coatings.
In order to satisfy the growing demand for fitness and sports specific surfaces at all levels of performance, an assortment of hardwood and synthetic floors have been designed to meet varying performance, price and presentation standards.
The Electrodeposition painting process involves vehicle bodies being immersed in a paint tank, with an electrical current passing through the steel parts causing the paint to adhere to the metal surfaces.
Globally, it is a little more difficult to judge the square mileage of impervious surfaces. "We can extrapolate from the United States to a degree," says Ferguson, "but there are too many variables to judge accurately." The United States has a lot of automobiles, and compared to many other countries, Americans tend to build more (and wider) roads, more (and bigger) parking lots, more (and more expansive) shopping centers, and larger houses (with accompanying larger roofs).
Details of our research results have appeared or will appear elsewhere (see, for instance Colloids and Surfaces 223, 215, 2003).
The composite disc is then ground and polished, revealing the polished analyte surfaces. As an example the SEM photograph in Fig.
The product includes a sanitary napkin having an at least partially adhesive outer surface and a sheet of packaging material wrapped around the sanitary napkin that has an inner surface facing the adhesive outer surface of the napkin.
Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) guidebook, Cooling Our Communities, this program encourages cities and towns to conserve energy and cool the urban "heat island" with trees and light-colored surfaces.
This non-contact, three-dimensional surface measurement system is said to feature fast, non-destructive measurements, point and shoot operation, high resolution, accuracy and repeatability on smooth or rough surfaces, and is said to be highly affordable.
Rhinovirus, which is responsible for roughly half of all common colds, survives on surfaces in hotel rooms for hours and can be transferred from there to people, a study shows.
Tool corrosion can be caused by water leaks contacting untreated mold surfaces, seeping through micro-cracks, or condensing in the mold (perhaps due to chillers running too cold), as well as spillage from ill-fitting o-rings and pipe fittings, or from hoses during hook-up, says Mike McCabe, marketing manager for Bekaert, a supplier of mold coatings.