suppose


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I don't suppose

Used as an introduction to a request that the speaker knows would please or benefit them but would likely be undesirable or annoying for the listener to carry out. A: "Well, what would you like to do this evening?" B: "I don't suppose you'd like to see that new sci-fi movie with me?" I know today is your day off, but I don't suppose you could find the time to mow the lawn?
See also: suppose

I don't suppose you

A polite way of introducing a request to someone for something you want or would like for them to do. Often followed by "could" or "would." I don't suppose you have a pen? Mine just ran out. I don't suppose you could bring this to Johnny tomorrow, could you? He needs it back, but I'm going to be at a dentist appointment. Hey, Mom? I don't suppose you would go over this math problem with me? I just can't get my head around it.
See also: suppose

I guess

I suppose; sure. Often used as an affirmative answer when one is not completely certain or does not want to fully commit. Bob: "You look a little down today. Everything alright?" Mary: "I guess. I've just been feeling vaguely melancholy lately." A: "It's supposed to be sunny today, right?" B: "I guess. I haven't checked the weather."
See also: guess

I guess not

An expression of vague denial or negation. A: "Is Tom coming?" B: "I guess not—it's getting pretty late."
See also: guess, not

I suppose (so)

An expression of vague affirmation or assent. A: "It's starting to get dark out, should we start heading home?" B: "I suppose so." Bob: "You look a little down today. Everything alright?" Mary: "I suppose. I've just been feeling vaguely melancholy lately."
See also: suppose

I suppose not

An expression of vague denial or negation. A: "Is Tom coming?" B: "I suppose not—it's getting pretty late."
See also: not, suppose

Suppose I do?

What would the consequences be if I did (whatever the other person just mentioned)? Implies that the speaker either believes they are right to do something, or else they are suspicious of the other person questioning them about it. A: "Your team isn't actually going to present that plan to the board, are you?" B: "Suppose we do? It may be a little unconventional, but they'll see that we are right." A: "So, what, you're going to just hop on a plane to Europe and show up on her front door?" B: "Suppose I do? I've always wanted to go to Europe, and at least then I'll know for sure how she feels."
See also: suppose

Suppose I don't?

What would the consequences be if I did not do (whatever you just mentioned)? Implies that the speaker either believes they are right not to do something, or else they are suspicious of the other person questioning them about it. A: "I'm warning you for the last time to take that money to the bank and deposit it!" B: "And suppose I don't? What exactly are you going to—report me to police?" A: "We need to report those earnings so we can pay taxes on them later." B: "Suppose we don't, though? Would anyone ever find out about it?"
See also: suppose

supposed to

1. Intended, expected, or believed to do something. This new software is supposed to make things a lot more efficient, but I find it so confusing that everything is taking me twice as long! We're supposed to arrive around 3 PM, assuming our flights aren't delayed.
2. Required or obligated to do something. I was supposed to be home an hour ago—my parents are going to kill me! Please don't distract him, he's supposed to be cleaning his room.
3. Allowed or permitted to do something. (Chiefly used in questions and negative constructions.) You're not supposed to go in there! Are you sure you're supposed to be in here?
See also: supposed, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

I guess

 and I expect; I suppose; I suspect 
1. a phrase that introduces a supposition. (Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Bob: I guess it's going to rain. Bill: Oh, I don't know. Maybe so, maybe not. Alice: I expect you'll be wanting to leave pretty soon. John: Why? It's early yet.
2. a vague way of answering 'yes'. John: You want some more coffee? Jane: I 'spose. Alice: Ready to go? John: I spect.
See also: guess

I guess not.

 and (I) don't think so.; I expect not.; I suppose not.; I suspect not.; I think not.
a vague statement of negation. (More polite or gentle than simply saying no. Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Bill: It's almost too late to go to the movie. Shall we try anyway? Mary: I guess not. Tom: Will it rain? Mary: I 'spect not.
See also: guess, not

I guess (so).

 and I believe so.; I expect (so).; I suppose (so).; I suspect (so).; I think so.
a vague expression of assent. (Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Tom: Will it rain today? Bob: I suppose so. Sue: Happy? Bill: I 'spect. Sue: You don't sound happy. Bill: I guess not.
See also: guess

Suppose I do?

 and Supposing I do?
Inf. And what does it matter if I do? What are you going to do about it? Alice: Do you really think it's right to do something like that? Sue: Suppose I do? Fred: Are you going to drive up into the mountains as you said you would? Sally: Supposing I do? Fred: I'm just asking.
See also: suppose

Suppose I don't?

 and Supposing I don't?
Inf. And what will happen if I don't? (Said as a sort of threat. Not usually with question intonation.) Bill: You'd better get yourself over to the main office. Tom: Suppose I don't? Father: You simply must do better in school. Tom: Supposing I don't? Father: Your clothing and personal belongings will be placed on the curb for the garbage pickup, and we will have the locks changed. Next question.
See also: suppose

supposed to

 and someone or something is supposed to
Someone or something is meant to do something. (Frequently, in speech, supposed is reduced to s'posed. The words someone or something can be replaced with nouns or pronouns, or used themselves.) Mary: They didn't deliver the flowers we ordered. Sue: Supposed to. Give them a call. Sally: This screw doesn't fit into hole number seven in the way the instructions say it should. Bill: It's supposed to. Something's wrong.
See also: supposed, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

I suppose so

I reluctantly agree, I guess so, as in Do you want tickets to the concert?-I suppose so, or Do you think it's going to rain?-I suppose so. [Mid-1500s]
See also: suppose

supposed to

1. Intended to; also, believed to, expected to. For example, This pill is supposed to relieve your pain, or You're supposed to be my partner. [Early 1300s]
2. Required to, as in He is supposed to call home. [Mid-1800s]
3. not supposed to. Not permitted to, as in You're not supposed to smoke in here.
See also: supposed, to
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

I don’t suppose you could...

used as a very polite way of asking somebody to do something for you: I don’t suppose you could carry this bag for me, could you?
See also: suppose

I supˈpose so

used for showing that you agree but you are not happy about it: ‘Can I borrow the car?’ ‘Yes, I suppose so, but be careful.’‘Can I invite him to the party?’ ‘I suppose so.’
See also: suppose
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in classic literature ?
But if some one who would rather not admit the immortality of the soul boldly denies this, and says that the dying do really become more evil and unrighteous, then, if the speaker is right, I suppose that injustice, like disease, must be assumed to be fatal to the unjust, and that those who take this disorder die by the natural inherent power of destruction which evil has, and which kills them sooner or later, but in quite another way from that in which, at present, the wicked receive death at the hands of others as the penalty of their deeds?
If, in our diagram, we suppose the amount of change represented by each successive group of diverging dotted lines to be very great, the forms marked a14 to p14, those marked b14 and f14, and those marked o14 to m14, will form three very distinct genera.
He decides, let us suppose, to go to a certain place, whereupon he proceeds to the station, takes his ticket and enters the train.
It is not necessary to suppose, as Freud seems to do, that every unconscious wish was once conscious, and was then, in his terminology, "repressed" because we disapproved of it.
They suppose that when wishes are repressed they are repressed into the 'unconscious,' and that this mysterious censor stands at the trapdoor lying between the conscious and the unconscious.
It is therefore natural to suppose that, what ever may be the correct definition of "consciousness," "consciousness" is not the essence of life or mind.
"I only mean that I suppose, from your manner of speaking, it must be the same to Miss Morton whether she marry Edward or Robert."
Just the kind of girl I should suppose likely to captivate poor Edward.
Did you ever suppose you'd see the day when you'd be adopting an orphan girl?
Suppose 'm you big fella white marster give 'm me one fella stick, close up me washee- washee you that fella steamer."
"Suppose 'm me no give?" the steward impatiently temporized.
As there is always more time and better opportunity to tamper with a standing body of magistrates than with a jury summoned for the occasion, there is room to suppose that a corrupt influence would more easily find its way to the former than to the latter.
It is natural to suppose that they are hitherto more attached to their own, and that each would struggle for the preference.
The examples of innovations which contract its ancient limits, as well in these States as in Great Britain, afford a strong presumption that its former extent has been found inconvenient, and give room to suppose that future experience may discover the propriety and utility of other exceptions.
SAMPLE 1: 'We saw some underage girls who are suppose to be in the school and one guy appeared some somewhere and threatened to beat us'(NGO Gives Hope to Vulnerable Children, The Nation, 6 January, 2019)