supper

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Last Supper

1. The last meal that Jesus shared with his disciples before his crucifixion, which some Christians believe instituted the sacrament of the Eucharist. In this usage, the phrase is usually capitalized We celebrate the Last Supper by going to Mass on Holy Thursday.
2. The last meal before something significant. A: "Thanks for coming to my last supper." B: "Oh, stop! I'm sure your surgery tomorrow will go fine." I can't believe this is my last supper as a single guy!
See also: last, supper

Lord's Supper

1. Another term for the Last Supper, the last meal that Jesus shared with his disciples before his crucifixion, which some Christians believe instituted the sacrament of Eucharist. We celebrate the Lord's Supper on Holy Thursday.
2. The sacrament of Eucharist. Now that you've made your First Holy Communion, you can receive the Lord's Supper during Mass.
See also: supper

sing for (one's) supper

To obtain something by working for it or by providing another service in return. You're welcome to stay with us on the farm as long as you like, but you'll have to sing for your supper while you're here.
See also: sing, supper

shoot (one's) supper

To shoot an animal that will be prepared as one's evening meal. We grew up on our own out in the wilds of the Appalachians, so shooting our supper wasn't anything we ever questioned.
See also: shoot, supper

(if you) sing before breakfast, (you'll) cry before supper

1. Proverb If one is too joyous or optimistic at the start of the day, one runs the risk of having a far fouler mood by the end of it. The grumpy old man, ever intolerant of others' happiness, scolded the girl humming to herself, saying, "If you sing before breakfast, you'll cry before supper!" A: "I thought the day was going to turn out so well, but everything has gone wrong!" B: "Ah, well, sing before breakfast, cry before supper."
2. Proverb One should not celebrate one's achievements before one's business has actually begun. A: "This new product is going to launch our company back to the forefront of the industry!" B: "Maybe let's wait until it's actually on the market before patting ourselves on the back. If you sing before breakfast, you'll cry before supper."
See also: before, cry, sing, supper

fix (something) for breakfast/lunch/dinner/etc.

To make or prepare some dish for a particular meal. I'm fixing spaghetti and meatballs for dinner tonight. We better get out of here if Aunt Louise is fixing something for supper—you know she can't cook.
See also: breakfast, dinner, fix, lunch

hope is a good breakfast but a bad supper

Optimism is best-suited to the start of something. Sure, it's OK to feel hopeful now, only a few days into the project. But if you don't have results as it wraps up, get ready for disappointment—after all, hope is a good breakfast but a bad supper.
See also: bad, breakfast, but, good, hope, supper

Hope is a good breakfast but a bad supper.

Prov. It is good to start the day feeling hopeful, but if none of the things you hope for come to pass by the end of the day, you will feel disappointed. (Can be used to warn someone against hoping for something that is unlikely to happen.) Lisa began the day hoping that she would find work, and by the end of the day she had learned that hope is a good breakfast but a bad supper.
See also: bad, breakfast, but, good, hope, supper

shoot one's cookies

 and shoot one's breakfast; shoot one's supper
Sl. to empty one's stomach; to vomit. I think I'm gonna shoot my cookies. I shot my supper, and I was glad to get rid of it.
See also: cooky, shoot

sing before breakfast, you'll cry before night

 and sing before breakfast, you'll cry before supper
Prov. If you wake up feeling very happy, your mood will change before the end of the day. Jill: I woke up in such a good mood today. I don't even know why, but everything seems good. Jane: Sing before breakfast, you'll cry before night. Alan: Good morning, dear! Isn't it a wonderful day? I feel great. Jane: Sing before breakfast, you'll cry before supper.
See also: before, cry, night, sing

sing for one's supper

Work for one's pay or reward, as in Entertaining visiting scientists is part of the job; you know I have to sing for my supper . This metaphoric term alludes to wandering minstrels who performed in taverns and were paid with a meal. First recorded in 1609, it gained currency with the familiar nursery rhyme, "Little Tommy Tucker, sings for his supper" (c. 1744).
See also: sing, supper

sing for your supper

OLD-FASHIONED
If you have to sing for your supper, you have to do a particular job before you are allowed to do or have something that you want. `Might you give me their number, Helena?' She took a while to answer. `Very well,' she said finally. `But you'll have to sing for your supper.'
See also: sing, supper

sing for your supper

earn a benefit or favour by providing a service in return.
This phrase comes from the nursery rhyme Little Tommy Tucker.
See also: sing, supper

sing for your ˈsupper

(old-fashioned) do something for somebody in order to get what you want or need: Susan has to clean her room before she’s allowed to go out with her friends — she really has to sing for her supper!
See also: sing, supper

shoot one’s cookies

and shoot one’s breakfast and shoot one’s supper
tv. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. I shot my supper, and I was glad to get rid of it. Whoa! I think I’m gonna shoot my cookies!
See also: cooky, shoot

shoot one’s supper

verb
See also: shoot, supper

sing for one's supper

Work in order to be paid. This metaphor, alluding to the wandering minstrels who performed in English taverns and were paid with a meal, also appears in the familiar nursery rhyme, “Little Tommy Tucker sings for his supper, What shall we give him? White bread and butter,” published in Tommy Thumb’s Pretty Song Book (ca. 1744). The expression is older still, appearing in Beaumont and Fletcher’s play The Knight of the Burning Pestle (1609, 2:2): “Let him stay at home and sing for his supper.”
See also: sing, supper
References in classic literature ?
"I do so want to have my supper with you," sighed Sara Ray, "but I s'pose ma will drag me with her wherever she goes.
A private dance, without sitting down to supper, was pronounced an infamous fraud upon the rights of men and women; and Mrs.
Chowder for breakfast, and chowder for dinner, and chowder for supper, till you began to look for fish-bones coming through your clothes.
Then we lit the lantern, and squatted down to supper.
that's impossible; they are two arrant scrubs, I warrant them; and I believe young Squire Allworthy guessed right, that the fellow intended to rob her ladyship; for, if he had broke open the lady's door with any of the wicked designs of a gentleman, he would never have sneaked away to another room to save the expense of a supper and a bed to himself.
"I thought," went on Chunk hopefully, "that if I had one of them powders to give Rosy when I see her at supper to-night it might brace her up and keep her from reneging on the proposition to skip.
Ethan, supposing the discussion to be over, had turned to go down to supper. He stopped short, not grasping what he heard.
I beg your pardon, monsieur; I forgot it is I who engage you at supper, and that I speak to a future cardinal."
With it was effaced the last trace of the preceding night; and then supper, Sinbad, hashish, statues, -- all became a dream for Franz.
It was only a few steps up the hill, and they found themselves then in a supper place of a very different class.
All I can tell you is that she left Dorset House in a hansom without the others, and said some thing about having supper with some friends."
When everything was ready, the landlord took off the cover for the last time, and then indeed there burst forth such a goodly promise of supper, that if he had offered to put it on again or had hinted at postponement, he would certainly have been sacrificed on his own hearth.
Perhaps I'll come and sit with you at supper. We'll have another dispute.
But his mother threw down her knitting, and, hurrying after him, took hold of his arm, and said, in a tone of plaintive remonstrance, "Nay, my lad, my lad, thee munna go wi'out thy supper; there's the taters wi' the gravy in 'em, just as thee lik'st 'em.
This piece of water (with an island in the middle which might have been the salad for supper) was of a circular form, and he had constructed a fountain in it, which, when you set a little mill going and took a cork out of a pipe, played to that powerful extent that it made the back of your hand quite wet.