soak in

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soak in

1. To seep, penetrate, or absorb in (to something). It takes a few hours for the mixture to soak in. If moisture soaks into the floorboards, it could cause them to warp or rot.
2. To be immersed in some substance, especially so as to absorb or be saturated by it. Let the beans soak in the stock to become soft and flavorful. The letters had been soaking in a puddle, so the writing was completely illegible.
3. To immerse someone or something in some substance so as to make them or it thoroughly wetted or saturated. A noun or pronoun is used between "soak" and "in." You want to soak the ham in water overnight to help draw some of the salt out of the meat. They soak you in a tub full of warm mud for half an hour. It sounds gross, but it's really relaxing!
4. To become understood; to make a lasting impression or memory. The gravity of what happened in this field 200 years ago didn't soak in until we saw actors recreating the war as it would have been fought. I was so stunned that none of what the police officer told me soaked in.
See also: soak

soak something in something

to leave something immersed in a liquid, intending for it to be absorbed. soak your feet in Epsom salts to make them feel better. I had to soak my elbow in ice water to take down the swelling.
See also: soak

soak in(to something)

[for moisture] to penetrate something. The rain soaked into the parched ground as fast as it fell. I'm glad it soaked in. I was afraid it would run off.
See also: soak

soak in

v.
To penetrate or permeate; seep: Wait until the dye soaks in before you handle the fabric. The speaker paused to let her words soak in.
See also: soak
References in periodicals archive ?
THE MINISTRY of Defence ( MoD) has given the nod for the salvage of INS Sindhurakshak -- the Kilo- class submarine that sunk in August last year inside the naval dockyard in Mumbai -- almost a month after the Navy submitted a proposal in this regard.
Making matters worse is that it has sunk in an area of restricted space at Mumbai's naval dockyard.
The recovery process has been taking time for two reasons: the navy doesn't have the expertise in handling salvage operations even though the vehicle has sunk in three metres of water at berth.