sunk


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heart sinks

(One) feels disappointed or disheartened. My heart sank when I saw that the meal I'd spent all day preparing had burned in the oven.
See also: heart, sink

be sunk in (something)

To be fully and deeply engrossed in a thought or idea, perhaps because one is feeling melancholy. It's no use trying to talk to Helen when she's sunk in thought like that; it's as if we don't even exist!
See also: sunk

sink in

1. To penetrate, absorb, or soak in (to something). It takes a few hours for the mixture to sink in. If the water sinks in, it could cause your floorboards to warp or even rot.
2. By extension, to become understood; to make a lasting impression or memory. The gravity of what happened in this field 200 years ago didn't sink in until we saw actors recreating the war as it would have been fought. No matter how many times I go over it, this equation just isn't sinking in.
See also: sink

sink into

1. To penetrate, absorb, or soak into something. If the water sinks into the floorboards, it could warping or even rot. It takes a few hours for the mixture to sink into the skin.
2. To enter into some passive, non-functional state. Within seconds I had sunk into a deep, dreamless sleep. After staring at the swinging watch, she sank into a hypnotic trance.
3. To force, press, or impale something into someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "sink" and "into." He sank the blade into the body of his enemy. The farmer sank the stakes of the fence into the ground with several swings of her sledgehammer.
4. To expend time, money, or other resources into someone or something as an investment, especially when those resources were or seem to have been squandered. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "sink" and "into." By the time the product was finally released onto the market, there was simply no way for the company to earn back what they had sunk into it. We sank a lot of hours into creating this program—if it doesn't work, I'm going to be very disappointed. The company sank so much money into me, between the training courses and masters degrees they paid for, that I feel guilty quitting.
See also: sink

soak in

1. To seep, penetrate, or absorb in (to something). It takes a few hours for the mixture to soak in. If moisture soaks into the floorboards, it could cause them to warp or rot.
2. To be immersed in some substance, especially so as to absorb or be saturated by it. Let the beans soak in the stock to become soft and flavorful. The letters had been soaking in a puddle, so the writing was completely illegible.
3. To immerse someone or something in some substance so as to make them or it thoroughly wetted or saturated. A noun or pronoun is used between "soak" and "in." You want to soak the ham in water overnight to help draw some of the salt out of the meat. They soak you in a tub full of warm mud for half an hour. It sounds gross, but it's really relaxing!
4. To become understood; to make a lasting impression or memory. The gravity of what happened in this field 200 years ago didn't soak in until we saw actors recreating the war as it would have been fought. I was so stunned that none of what the police officer told me soaked in.
See also: soak

sink in

 
1. Lit. to sink, submerge, or descend into something. How long will it take the water to sink in? It might take days for the oil to sink in, so you have time to clean it up.
2. Fig. [for knowledge] to be understood. I heard what you said, but it took a while for it to sink in. I pay careful attention to everything I hear in calculus class, but it usually doesn't sink in.
See also: sink

sink something in (to) someone or something

 and sink something in 
1. Lit. to drive or push something into someone or something. The brave hero sank the wooden stake into the vampire. The hero sank in the stake.
2. Fig. to invest time or money in someone or something. (Sometimes implying that it was wasted.) You would not believe how much money I've sunk into that company! She sank in a lot of money, but it was all wasted.
See also: sink

soak in(to something)

[for moisture] to penetrate something. The rain soaked into the parched ground as fast as it fell. I'm glad it soaked in. I was afraid it would run off.
See also: soak

soak something in something

to leave something immersed in a liquid, intending for it to be absorbed. soak your feet in Epsom salts to make them feel better. I had to soak my elbow in ice water to take down the swelling.
See also: soak

sink in

Penetrate the mind, be absorbed, as in The news of the crash didn't sink in right away. [Late 1300s]
See also: sink

be ˈsunk in something

be in a state of unhappiness or deep thought: She just sat there, sunk in thought.
See also: something, sunk

sink in

v.
1. To seep or soak; penetrate: When the floodwaters sink in, the ground will become soft.
2. To make an impression; become felt or understood: The meaning of the poem finally sank in after I had thought about it for a while.
See also: sink

sink into

v.
1. To pass into some condition: She sank into a deep sleep.
2. To seep or soak into something; penetrate something: The water is sinking into the ground.
3. To invest some resources in something, especially without any prospect of return: If the city continues to sink money into that new convention center, it will go broke.
See also: sink

soak in

v.
To penetrate or permeate; seep: Wait until the dye soaks in before you handle the fabric. The speaker paused to let her words soak in.
See also: soak
References in periodicals archive ?
October 1915 | Craigston, a steam screw with a gross tonnage of 2,616, vessel torpedoed and sunk in the Aegean Sea on October 4, 1915.
December 1915 | Helmsmuir, a steam screw with a gross tonnage of 4,111, vessel torpedoed and sunk in the Mediterranean on or about December 2, 1915.
March 1916 | Horngarth, a steam screw with a gross tonnage of 3,608, vessel sunk by the German raider Seeadler on March 11, 1917.
Adamton, a steam screw with a gross tonnage of 2,304, vessel sunk by an enemy submarine on April 8, 1916.
Cardonia, a sailing ship with a gross tonnage of 2,168, registry closed May 15, 1916, vessel sunk by German submarine on April 6, 1916.
Lady Ninian (formerly Llanwern), a steam screw with a gross tonnage of 4,296, vessel sunk by German submarine in the Mediterranean on May 28, 1916.
June 1917 | St Andrews, a steam screw with a gross tonnage of 3,613, vessel sunk by enemy submarine in the Mediterranean on June 13, 1917.
Appledore, a steam screw with a gross tonnage of 3,843, vessel sunk by an enemy submarine on June 9, 1917.
Enidwen, a steam screw with a gross tonnage of 3,594, vessel sunk by an enemy submarine in Atlantic on June 8, 1917.
South Wales, a steam screw with a gross tonnage of 3,667, vessel sunk by enemy submarine in the Atlantic on June 24, 1917.
Ruperra, a steam screw with a gross tonnage of 4,231, vessel sunk by enemy submarine in the Mediterranean on June 20, 1917.
Haulwen, a steam screw with a gross tonnage of 4,031, vessel sunk by an enemy submarine on June 9, 1917.
Merioneth, a steam screw with a gross tonnage of 3,003, vessel sunk by an enemy submarine on June 3, 1917, Certificate of registry taken by the commander of the submarine.
July 1917 | Asama, a steam screw with a gross tonnage of 284, vessel sunk by an enemy submarine on July 17, 1917.
Lady Ismay | Snowdonian, a steam screw with a gross tonnage of 3,869, vessel sunk by an enemy submarine on July 31, 1917, Certificate of registry taken by the submarine commander.