sundry


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all and sundry

Everybody. Jason bought drinks for all and sundry to celebrate his promotion.
See also: all, and, sundry

various and sundry

Of or having a large and varied or miscellaneous range. The term is a redundancy ("various" and "sundry" are synonyms) used for emphasis. Shops like these specialize in various and sundry little knickknacks, but rarely anything of real value. I have to distill all the various and sundry details from the experiments into a cohesive report.
See also: and, sundry
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

all and sundry

Cliché everyone; one and all. Cold drinks were served to all and sundry.
See also: all, and, sundry
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

all and sundry

One and all, as in The salesman gave samples to all and sundry. [Late 1400s]
See also: all, and, sundry

various and sundry

Of different kinds, miscellaneous, as in Various and sundry items did not sell, so they'll probably hold another auction. This expression is a redundancy, the two adjectives meaning just about the same thing.
See also: and, sundry
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

all and sundry

All and sundry means everyone rather than particular people. I made tea for all and sundry at the office. He was well known to all and sundry.
See also: all, and, sundry
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

all and sundry

everyone.
1991 Sunday Times In the manner of an Oscar-winner, she thanks all and sundry for their help.
See also: all, and, sundry
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˌall and ˈsundry

(informal) everyone; people of all kinds: I don’t like you talking about my personal problems to all and sundry.
See also: all, and, sundry
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

all and sundry

Everyone, both collectively and individually. The term dates from at least the fourteenth century and is tautological—that is, it needlessly repeats the same thing, just as the related each and every does.
See also: all, and, sundry

various and sundry

Miscellaneous, of different kinds. This phrase is actually redundant, the two adjectives having almost identical meanings. Various has meant “a variety of ” since the 1500s; sundry, which is rarely heard today except in this cliché, has meant “consisting of miscellaneous items” since the late 1700s. Their pairing appears to come from inventory lists of some kind.
See also: and, sundry
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

various and sundry

Different and unspecified items. “Various” means “several different things.” So does “sundry” (variety stores sold sundry goods), so to report that “the meeting discussed various and sundry topics” is to be redundant. But that's never stopped all but the linguistically fastidious from using such expressions.
See also: and, sundry
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
Paint Sundry's line of brushes and rollers includes Purdy, Bestt Liebco and Symphony brands.
Connor said Paint Sundry Brands, which is based in Philadelphia, will also enhance Sherwin-Williams' coatings applicator manufacturing and distribution infrastructure.
Dating back to the 1990s, deputies had visited the Danjanic home at least 10 times on sundry grievances, including complaints by neighbors Steve and Rosemarie Paullin about barking dogs and loud music.