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Indian summer

1. A period of unseasonably warm weather in early fall. I know it's September, but don't get out your winter clothes just yet—this area often has an Indian summer. I hate the cold weather, so I'm hoping for an Indian summer.
2. A particularly peaceful, successful, or enjoyable time as something nears its end. As her illness worsened, my grandmother still enjoyed painting, so I think she had an Indian summer before her death. I wonder if people sensed that they were in an Indian summer just before the Great Depression.
See also: Indian, summer

one swallow does not a summer make

proverb One piece of evidence does not mean that something is definitely the case or is going to happen. A reference to the migration of swallows that happens in the spring or early summer. A lot of things went right for us this year, but one swallow does not a summer make—we still have a long ways to go before our finances are back in order. A: "I'm really worried the boss is going to fire me. He said he really wasn't happy with my work lately!" B: "Calm down, one swallow does not a summer make."
See also: does, make, not, one, summer, swallow

one swallow does not make a summer

One piece of evidence does not mean that something is definitely the case or is going to happen. A reference to the migration of swallows that happens in the spring or early summer. A lot of things went right for us this year, but one swallow does not make a summer—we still have a long ways to go before our finances are back in order. A: "I'm really worried the boss is going to fire me. He said he really wasn't happy with my work lately!" B: "Calm down, one swallow doesn't make a summer."
See also: does, make, not, one, summer, swallow

summer and winter

To monitor one's behavior or abilities for a sufficiently long period of time. Oh yes, I will summer and winter him during this probationary period, to determine if we should hire him full-time.
See also: and, summer, winter

summer complaint(s)

euphemism, obsolete Any severe gastrointestinal infection, but especially food poisoning or cholera, typically contracted by children in the summertime. Mary has a bit of the summer complaint, so she has taken to bed for the rest of the week. Before personal hygiene and food safety practices became commonplace, children became ill and died from what adults rather flippantly called summer complaints.
See also: summer

the dog days

1. The period in the summer often thought to be hottest, usually considered to be July 3 to August 11. In ancient times, people associated the heat during this period with the concurrent rising of Sirius, nicknamed "the dog star." The phrase is a translation of the Latin dies caniculares, meaning "dog star days." As a kid, I loved lounging in the swimming pool during the dog days of summer.
2. By extension, a period of lethargy, inactivity, or stagnation. We're in the dog days of our fiscal year, and unfortunately we'll just have to make up for it during the holiday season.
See also: days, dog
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

One swallow does not make a summer,

 and One swallow does not a summer make.
Prov. You should not assume that something is true just because you have seen one piece of evidence for it. Amanda: I got a good grade on this quiz! My troubles in school are over. Nancy: One swallow does not a summer make.
See also: does, make, not, one, summer, swallow
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Indian summer

A period of mild, sunny weather occurring in late autumn, usually following a seasonable cold spell. For example, We had two whole days of Indian summer this year, and then it turned cold again. [Late 1700s]
See also: Indian, summer
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

an Indian summer

mainly BRITISH
An Indian summer is a period of great success late in someone's life or career, often after a period of not being successful. Despite an unexpected Indian Summer, they never really lived up to their initial promise. Note: An Indian summer is a period of unusually warm sunny weather during the autumn.
See also: Indian, summer

one swallow doesn't make a summer

You say one swallow doesn't make a summer to mean that although something good has happened, the situation may not continue to be good, and you cannot rely on it. Sales in December were up about 1 percent, which of course, is good news. One swallow, however, doesn't make a summer and it remains to be seen whether they can maintain this growth in the difficult months ahead. Note: People often use the more literary phrase one swallow does not a summer make. One swallow does not a summer make, but a visit to the Hotel Metropole in Ipswich goes a long way to improving that city's reputation. Note: Swallows are a type of bird. The reference here is to the arrival of swallows in Europe at the beginning of summer, after spending the winter further south.
See also: make, one, summer, swallow
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

Indian summer

1 a period of dry, warm weather occurring in late autumn. 2 a tranquil or productive period in someone's later years.
2 1930 Vita Sackville-West The Edwardians Meanwhile she was quite content that Sebastian should become tanned in the rays of Sylvia's Indian summer.
See also: Indian, summer

one swallow doesn't make a summer

a single fortunate event does not mean that what follows will also be good. proverb
1998 Spectator One swallow doesn't make a summer…nor one instance of police dereliction of duty, incompetence, laziness and stupidity a complete breakdown in law and order.
See also: make, one, summer, swallow
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

an ˌIndian ˈsummer


1 a period of unusually dry, warm weather in the autumn: We had a splendid Indian summer last October.
2 a period of success or happiness near the end of somebody’s life: He made his best movies in his seventies; it was for him a real Indian summer.
See also: Indian, summer

one ˌswallow doesn’t make a ˈsummer

(saying) you must not take too seriously a small sign that something is happening or will happen in the future: ‘We got a big order from Sweden this morning. Things are getting better.’ ‘One swallow doesn’t make a summer, you know. Don’t be too optimistic.’
This expression refers to the fact that swallows (= small birds with a tail with two points) spend the winter in Africa but fly to northern countries for the summer.
See also: make, one, summer, swallow
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

summer complaint

n. diarrhea, especially that experienced in the summer. I’ve got a touch of the summer complaint.
See also: complaint, summer
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

one swallow does not make a summer

A single portent or element of something does not mean the totality is here. This ancient adage, known already in Greek times, may come from one of Aesop’s fables. A swallow emerges on a warmer-than-usual winter day, and a young man, seeing it, sells his warm cloak and spends the proceeds on drink and carousing. The following week, the weather turns cold again, and he, shivering without his cloak, discovers that one swallow did not mean summer had arrived. Appearing in many proverb collections and in numerous languages, along with numerous variants (One grain does not fill a sack, one actor cannot make a play, and the like), the term was defined by George Pettie in 1576: “As one swallow does not make sommer, so one particularity concludeth no generality.”
See also: does, make, not, one, summer, swallow
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in classic literature ?
All were young and pretty, and bathed in summer bloom; but not one had the nymph- like ease of his wife, when, with tense muscles and happy frown, she bent her soul upon some feat of strength.
Such fol-de-rol, her not coming for the summer; but I gave up arguing with young people about fifty years ago.
He knew that she had spent the previous summer at Newport, where she appeared to have gone a great deal into society, but that in the autumn she had suddenly sub-let the "perfect house" which Beaufort had been at such pains to find for her, and decided to establish herself in Washington.
`Maybe I'll go home and help you thresh next summer. Isn't that taffy nearly ready to eat?
Softly the warm winds kissed their cheeks; Brightly the sunbeams fell, As, one by one, they came again In their summer homes to dwell.
Violet peeped from the tall green ferns, And lifted her soft blue eye To watch the glittering form, that shone Afar in the summer sky.
And the home thou shared with the friendless worm The butterfly's home shall be; And thou shalt find, dear, faithful flower, A loving friend in me." Then, through the long, bright summer hours Through sunshine and through shower, Together in their happy home Dwelt butterfly and flower.
They devoted their summers to exploring (and exploiting) Canada's riches.
Save our summers! 'Tis the rallying cry heard round the nation as districts push school start dates into early August.
However, Northern Ontario Business has learned there are some questions surrounding this project and the proponent, Gordon Summers.
By Martin Summers (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004.
Summers Only Music Education Degrees, Rochester, 6/27-8/5.
The NIEHS Summers of Discovery program was launched in 1989 as a way to give talented high school, undergraduate, and graduate students, as well as high school and college faculty, a more in-depth exposure to the world of scientific research.
Fugate, who told sheriff's deputies that she feared for her safety because her husband had threatened her life, was staying with friends Paul and Dianna Summers in Maryville, Tennessee.